Séminaires

Upcoming seminars

Seminars will be given both on site and online

Colloque CERES

Date: May 7, 2021
Time: from 9 am
Registration: https://framaforms.org/inscription-colloque-ceres-mai-2021-1613488436
Organised by: Marc Fleurbaey, Alessandra Giannini, Fanny Henriet, Magali Reghezza, Corinne Robert, Gaëlle Ronsin
Title: Atténuation ou adaptation ? Perspectives et prospectives environnementales et sociales
Programme:

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: May 11, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Luce Fleitout (LG ENS)
Title: Some constraints and questions concerning mantle viscosities

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: May 25, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Laurence Bodelot (Polytechnique)
Title: TBA

Département de Géosciences

Date: June 1st, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Coralie Chevallier (ENS – DEC)
Title: TBA

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: June 29, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Sergio Vinciguerra (UniTO)
Title: TBA

Past seminars

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: May 4, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Guilhem Mollon (INSA Lyon)
Title: Simulating melting in seismic fault gouge

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique – ENS

Date: May 3, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Aurélien Ribes (CNRM)
Title: Merging models and observations to narrow uncertainty on past and future human-induced warming
Abstract: Many studies have sought to constrain climate projections and climate sensitivity based on recent observations. Until recently, these constraints had limited impact, and projected warming ranges were driven primarily by model outputs. Here, we use the newest climate model ensemble (CMIP6), improved observations, and a new statistical method to narrow uncertainty on estimates of past and future human-induced warming. Our new statistical method allows us to simultaneously attribute historical changes to specific forcings (attribution) and constrain projections. It provides a consistent picture of on-going changes, through merging model simulations and observations in a Bayesian fashion. Cross-validation suggests that our method produces robust results and is not overconfident. We derive consistent observationally constrained estimates of attributable warming to date and warming rate, the response to a range of future scenarios, and metrics of climate sensitivity. We find that historical observations narrow uncertainty on projected future warming by about 50%. Our results suggest that using an unconstrained multimodel ensemble is no longer the best choice for global mean temperature projections. In a somewhat paradoxical way, they also suggest that (i) the upper end of CMIP6 models projected warming cannot be reconciled with observations, and that (ii) the lower end of previous estimates of 21st century warming can now be excluded.

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: April 13, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Mathilde Cannat (IPGP)
Title: On magma supply and spreading modes at slow and ultraslow mid-ocean ridges

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: March 30, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Gianluca Gerardi (LG ENS)
Title: The effect of subduction zones on large-scale mantle convection and some perspectives on convection experiments based on colloidal systems
Abstract: Several authors have suggested that mantle convection is primarily resisted by strong subduction zones, which if true implies small or even negative values of the exponent β in the Nusselt number/Rayleigh number relation Nu ∼ Raβ. To evaluate this hypothesis, we use the boundary element method (BEM) to study the energetics of subduction in a two-dimensional system comprising two purely viscous plates, a subducting plate (SP) and an overriding plate (OP), immersed in an infinitely deep ambient fluid beneath a free-slip surface. For reasonable viscosity contrasts between the plates and the mantle, i.e. ηPM ∈ [250, 2500], our BEM solutions show that the dissipation is always dominated by the ambient mantle contribution. We demonstrate that a small value of the exponent β follows from an overestimation of the viscous dissipation related to the deformation of the SP and, in particular, from the adoption of the minimum radius of curvature for the characterization of the SP bending. Using the correct length scale (the “bending length”; Ribe, 2010), we find β ∈ [0.25, 0.34], which is not much different than the classical result of 1/3. We conclude that subduction zone dissipation is not large enough to change substantially the classical Nusselt number/Rayleigh number scaling law. As some recent studies suggest (e.g. Grigné & Combes, 2020; Seals & Lenardic, 2020), it is probably necessary to look elsewhere to reconcile geodynamical and geochemical arguments regarding the thermal history of the Earth. We, finally, run a convection experiment based on the drying of colloidal dispersions, which can generate an “Earth-like” thermal convection. This type of experiment seems to effectively captures the essence of Earth’s mantle convection and the particular features which characterized it as, for instance, the breakage of the upper boundary layer and the subsequent phenomenon of one-sided subduction. Exploring further these systems, especially for what concern the link between microscopic-scale phenomena, colloid rheology transitions and macroscopic properties of the material, seems a promising route to follow in order to get a clearer picture of how mantle convection works.

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: March 23, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Louis de Barros (Université Côte d’Azur)
Title: Fluid-induced seismicity in natural and anthropic contexts

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique – ENS

Date: March 22, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Tjarda Roberts (LPC2E-CNRS, Orléans)
Title: The Atmospheric Chemistry of Volcanic Plumes
Abstract: Volcanoes release gases and particles to the atmosphere, by explosive eruptions and by continuous passive degassing. The most commonly studied gas is SO2, which becomes oxidized into the atmosphere to form sulfate particles that impact climate. Volcanoes also release halogens (e.g. HBr, HCl, HI). These were assumed to simply be washed out of the atmosphere, but are now known to also undergo oxidation in the plume, as evidenced by observations of volcanic halogen radicals (BrO, OClO). To understand these observations, a suite of numerical models of the volcanic plume chemistry has been developed, from the hot crater to the regional scale. The models show how multi-phase chemical reactions in the plume lead to the formation of BrO and OClO. This volcanic plume halogen chemistry acts to destroy tropospheric ozone. It also impacts NOxy HOx and mercury chemistry, and can critically influence sulfur oxidation processes. The model results demonstrate the need to include volcanic halogens for a complete understanding of the formation of sulfate particles and chemistry-climate impacts of volcanic plumes.
To better characterize volcanic emissions, we have applied small low-cost sensors for SO2, H2S, HCl, CO and H2 and particles to measure the plume composition in-situ at the volcano summit. Here, the pollution levels are very high (e.g. tens of ppmv SO2) but decline rapidly as the plume disperses and dilutes in the atmosphere. Ongoing work is advancing these methods for long-term measurements in concentrated and dilute plumes, near and far from volcanoes. However, at low pollution levels, it becomes challenging to accurately measure gas abundances using small sensors. In a project in Fairbanks, Alaska, versions of the sensors for CO, NO, NO2, ozone and particles have been deployed to measure urban pollution. By cross-comparing the sensor output to Air-Quality monitors and developing algorithms of the sensor response functions it becomes possible to accurately measure urban pollutants (down to tens ppbv gas). A field-demonstrated and future application of the small sensors is to deploy on moving platforms to characterize and spatially map pollutant plumes.

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: March 9, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Louise Jeandet (ISTeP)
Title: The impact of Large Erosional Events on the Seismicity of Faults

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: March 16, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Benjamin Malvoisin (ISTerre)
Title: Interplay between reaction, fluid flow and deformation during serpentinization

Département de Géosciences

Date: March 2, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Michael Ghil (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (IPSL & CNRS), Ecole normale supérieure – PSL and Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences Department, University of California at Los Angeles, CA, USA)
Title: Tipping Points Across the Climate Modeling Hierarchy
Abstract: Tipping points (TPs) are everywhere, in particular so in the climate sciences. We define TPs rigorously as a generalization of classical bifurcations to nonautonomous and random dynamical systems. Next, we explain the key concepts of dynamical systems with time-dependent forcing and the methods for a self-consistent study thereof. The obvious motivation for such a study of TPs and of the associated pullback attractors (PBAs) is describing, understanding and predicting the global change of a complex system with many scales of motion, in time and space, like the climate system.
Examples of application will go from the classical Lorenz convection system with multiplicative noise, through an El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) model subject to the seasonal cycle and a low-order model of the midlatitude oceans’ circulation driven by time-dependent wind, and on to an intermediate, coupled ocean–atmosphere model of the midlatitudes driven by ENSO forcing. If time permits, a brief excursion into coupled climate–economy modeling from this perspective will also be made.

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: February 9, 2021
Time: 14h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/257589773
By: Arnaud Montabert (ENS)
Title: Characterizing ground motion of historical earthquakes – Study of Sant’Agata del Mugello combining building archaeology, earthquake engineering and seismology
Abstract: A fault is charged during (hundred-) thousand years, then the accumulated elastic energy is released in few seconds when an earthquake occurs. To correctly assess seismic hazard it is of capital importance to study the seismic history. Over the last decades approaches such as historical seismology, archaeoseismology and paleoseismology have been developed chasing alternative sources of information. Among them, historical buildings witnessed ancient earthquakes as « stone seismometers » recorded in their walls as structural disorders and repairs. I develop an innovative methodology connecting building archaeology, seismology and earthquake engineering. I aim to show that archaeological characterization of post-seismic repairs on historical buildings can successfully infer key ground motion characteristics of historical earthquakes. The test case is the medieval church of Sant’Agata del Mugello, an exceptional site with many historical sources describing the damages induced by past earthquakes, and their renovation. The site is located in the Mugello basin (Central Apennines, Italy, Tuscany), characterized by a moderate seismicity. The largest known events occurred in 1542 (Mw 6) and 1919 (Mw 6.3). I first trace the seismic history of the church by combing a stratigraphic analysis of the building with an in-depth study of historical texts. A CAD-based model of the current church is designed from a laser scanner survey. A CAD-model of the church before and after each historical earthquake is then extrapolated from the current church and its deduced constructive history. I have developed an ad hoc meshing code to generate a finite element mesh from the CAD-based model. We perform two ambient vibration testing survey in the church. 8 modes of vibration (natural frequency, modal shapes and damping ratio) are estimated. A Vibration-Based model updating based on the identified experimental parameters and the constructive history of the church allows to calibrate the numerical model of the church in its linear part. A continuum damage model is used to identify the limit of the linear model of the church. I then focus on the study of the 1919 non damaging earthquake. A collection of waveforms compatible with the seismotectonic context is selected, corrected, and used to solicit the updated linear digital model of the church. I show preliminary results to discuss the ground motion characteristics of the 1919 earthquake.
Jury: Gianmarco DE FELICE (Department of Engineering, Roma Tre University): Opponent
Jean-François SEMBLAT (Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Techniques Avancées, Institut Polytechnique de Paris): Opponent
Pascal BERNARD (Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris): Examiner
Cédric GIRY (Laboratoire de Mécanique et Technologie, Ecole Normale Supérieure Paris-Saclay): Examiner
Laura PECCHIOLI (Humboldt Universität): Examiner
Hélène DESSALES  (Archéologie et philologie d’Orient et d’Occident, Ecole Normale Supérieure): Invited member (Co-supervisor)
Maria LANCIERI (Bureau d’évaluation des risques sismiques pour la sûreté des installations, Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire): Co-supervisor
Hélène LYON-CAEN (Laboratoire de Géologie, Ecole Normale Supérieure): PhD Director

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: February 9, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Damian Walwer (ENS Lyon)
Title: Magma ascent and emplacement below floor fractured craters on the Moon from floor uplift and fracture length

Département de Géosciences

Date: February 2, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Céline Guivarch (CIRED, Ecole des Ponts ParisTech)
Title: Le changement climatique vu à travers les lunettes d’une économiste

Laboratoire du LMD-ENS

Date: February 1st, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Claudine Wenhaji Ndomeni (LMD-ENS)
Title: Dynamical and thermodynamic changes in the historical response of Atlantic sector rainfall to anthropogenic emissions in the IPSL-5A model

Soutenance – HDR

Date: January 29, 2021
Time: 16h
Location: https://zoom.us/j/95778962430?pwd=UzJzeU5Ja0NSaXpNMGY5K1ZvTnJLUT09

Meeting ID: 957 7896 2430
Passcode: 8ZRfLV
By: Harsha S. Bhat (ENS)
Title: Supershear Earthquakes: Theory, Experiments & Observations
Jury: Alexandre Schubnel (Laboratoire de Géologie, Ecole Normale Supérieure) : Correspondant
Michel Bouchon (Institut des Sciences de la Terre, Université Grenoble Alpes) : Rapporteur
Djimedo Kondo (Institut Jean le Rond d’Alembert, Sorbonne Université) : Rapporteur
Paul A. Johnson (Los Alamos National Laboratories) : Rapporteur
Shamita Das (Oxford University) : Examinatrice
Ares J. Rosakis (California Institute of Technology) : Examinateur

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: January 26, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: François Passelègue (EPFL)
Title: On the scale dependence in the dynamics of rupture

Changement climatique : sciences, politique, société

Date: January 21, 2021
Time: 14h-17h
Location: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/266255181
By: Emmanuel Combet (ADEME) et Antonin Pottier (EHESS), économistes & Jean-Baptiste Comby (Université Paris 2 Panthéon Assas), sociologue
Title: Écologisation des comportements, inégalités et classes sociales
Abstract:
Qui émet du CO2 ? Regard critique sur le calcul et l’usage des panoramas d’inégalités écologiques par Emmanuel Combet (ADEME) et Antonin Pottier (EHESS)
Nous présentons de manière détaillée et critique les présupposés et conventions méthodologiques retenues pour le calcul des « émissions des ménages ». Nous décortiquons chaque étape en construisant un panorama des inégalités d’émission pour la France. Nous identifions trois écueils dans la façon dont l’information sur les inégalités écologiques diffuse dans l’espace public. D’abord cette information diffuse comme « une évidence », alors qu’il existe de multiple « conventions d’attribution » et panorama des émissions possibles. Ensuite, il existe un lien implicite entre le choix des conventions d’attribution et la conception des responsabilités que le panorama véhicule. Par exemple, l’empreinte carbone qui assigne aux ménages les émissions des produits consommés véhicule une conception particulière qui focalise l’attention sur les contributions des individus, sur leurs choix ; elle occulte le rôle des acteurs non individuels tout comme la composante collective des émissions de GES, et néglige les dimensions de la responsabilité qui ne sont pas liées à la consommation. Enfin, le lien entre inégalités écologiques et inégalités de revenu est aujourd’hui très médiatisé, alors que l’analyse fine souligne que les inégalités écologiques ne peuvent être identifiées aux inégalités de revenus. Il existe une forte variabilité, à tout niveau de revenu, selon des facteurs géographiques et techniques qui contraignent à recourir aux énergies fossiles. L’ensemble de ce travail souligne l’importance de penser plus précisément, avec un regard critique, les différentes propositions de « transition juste ».
Apports et limites des quantifications de la distribution sociale des émissions de GES pour analyser les rapports de classe en jeu sur le terrain écologique par Jean-Baptiste Comby (Université Paris 2 Panthéon Assas)
Les études économétriques qui se développent depuis une dizaine d’années pour éclairer les quantités de GES émises en différents points de l’espace social aident à documenter les inégalités de contribution aux dérèglements climatiques. Elles peinent cependant à rendre compte des logiques sociales au principe de ces émissions et de leurs différentiels. Plus, elles invisibilisent les tissus relationnels au sein desquels se forgent les comportements, les « modes de vie » et leur comptabilité carbone, laquelle ne peut être restreinte aux émissions du ménage. En mobilisant certains développements récents tant de la sociologie des « styles de vie » que des classes sociales, il est alors possible d’allonger la portée de ces données et de montrer comment la distribution sociale des rapports à l’enjeu écologique contribue à renforcer la hiérarchie entre les groupes sociaux. Un tel constat empirique n’est pas sans incidences sur les manières de penser la « transformation » des sociétés que les divers protagonistes de la cause environnementale appellent de leurs vœux.

Laboratoire du LMD-ENS

Date: January 18, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Jacopo Riboldi (LMD-ENS)
Title: Quantifying the effects of Arctic Amplification on midlatitude Rossby waves employing spectral analysis
Abstract: The reduction in the Arctic-to-midlatitude temperature gradient, related to the rapid progression of global warming over high latitudes, has the potential to reconfigure the background flow in which midlatitude Rossby waves form and propagate. Among the hypothesized effects of this phenomenon, known as Arctic Amplification, there are 1) a reduction in the eastward propagation of upper-level troughs and ridges, that would reverberate in an increased persistence of weather conditions, and 2) the development of quasi resonant, stationary Rossby waves with preferred wavenumbers. Both these problems can be tackled with spectral analysis, that provides a compact decomposition of the Rossby wave pattern in a series of wavenumber/phase speed harmonics and highlights at the same time which harmonics are active over the Northern Hemisphere in each considered time period. This analysis is also a first step to obtain a high frequency, global metric of Rossby phase speed, that is employed to investigate trends in the stationarity of weather patterns and its relationship with the Arctic amplification signal.

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: January 12, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Anthony Sladen (Geoazur)
Title: On the potential of underwater DAS
Abstract: Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) is a recent instrumental development allowing to turn optical fibers into long and dense seismo-acoustic arrays. In 2019, several studies have demonstrated the ability to get meaningful measurements from seafloor telecom cables. Therefore, DAS carries high hopes after decades of efforts to find an efficient and cost-effective solution to monitor geophysical signals on the sea-bottom. In this seminar, I will present some recent works investigating signals recorded from one cable in the South of France, and two cables in the South-West of Greece. For the most part, these cables are laid on the seafloor and not buried. This configuration is probably less ideal but representative of the vast majority of the global network of seafloor telecom cables. I will highlight some limitations of the approach, but also stress that the technology continues to hold promising prospects for tackling long-standing scientific questions and respond to pressing societal needs.

Changement climatique : sciences, politique, société

Date: January 8, 2021
Time: 14h-17h
Location: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/266255181
By: Michel Crucifix (physicien, UC Louvain) & Didier Paillard (climatologue, LSCE)
Title: Le concept de point de bascule est-il utile pour appréhender l’évolution future du climat?
Abstract:
Peut-on parler de catastrophe sans être catastrophiste ? par Didier Paillard (climatologue, LSCE)
La longue histoire de notre Planète peut être racontée comme une succession d’événements marquants, des « catastrophes », qui depuis le XIXème siècle nous servent de base chronologique, ou plus exactement de base stratigraphique. Les mécanismes responsables de ces transitions géologiques restent, encore aujourd’hui, souvent énigmatiques, et il est parfois tentant d’y voir simplement des « coups du sort ». Mais les notions d’évolution et de gradualisme se sont peu à peu imposées : une évolution physico-chimique basée sur des lois déterministes, et une évolution biologique que certains ont assimilé à la notion de progrès.  Dans le contexte actuel de l’Anthropocène, la notion de « points de bascule », ou « tipping points » nous renvoie vers cette opposition entre changements progressifs et prévisibles d’une part, et événements rapides et difficiles à anticiper d‘autre part. Dans mon exposé, je présenterai quelques exemples emblématiques de « points de bascule » dans l’histoire de notre planète, et je tenterai d’en présenter quelques caractéristiques communes importantes, comme les notions d’équilibres multiples et d’hystérésis. J’insisterai sur les difficultés d’aborder ces questions : outre les difficultés techniques, et plus encore les limites et les biais de notre imaginaire, le rôle de Cassandre n’est pas très constructif.
Point du bascule global: entre démarche scientifique et imaginaire mythique par Michel Crucifix (physicien, UC Louvain)
Une fois n’est pas coutume, cet exposé relatera une histoire personnelle. En 2016, après quelques échanges avec Marten Scheffer, Will Steffen m’a invité à contribuer à un article déjà bien en chemin traitant des trajectoires de l’Anthropocène. L’article reprend les codes sémantiques de la théorie des systèmes dynamiques et du contrôle (feedback, forcing, bifurcation) et son illustration graphique évoque une alternative entre une « governed Earth » et une  « ice-free earth ». Cette dernière deviendra, dans la version finale, la « hothouse » que Radio Canada traduit par  « Terre étuve ». De façon subliminale, le code graphique final évoque les paysages épigénétiques de Waddington, rappelant indirectement les liens de plusieurs auteurs avec l’épopée Gaia.  J’étais loin de me douter à l’époque du destin de cet article, voire de ses potentielles conséquences politiques, que la volumineuse thèse de Sébastien Dutreuil  m’aurait peut-être  permis d’anticiper. Un peu sonné par cette aventure, j’ai répondu en 2019 à une autre invitation de Mike Hulme à un duel rhétorique face à James Annan autour du thème : « Will exceeding 2C of warming lock the world onto a ‘Hothouse Earth’ trajectory? ». Nous avons dû faire évoluer la question, car les deux protagonistes étaient bien trop d’accord sur la réponse à y apporter.

Département de Géosciences

Date: January 5, 2021
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Anna Ternon (ENS)
Title: Les chantiers du paysage – Premières étapes d’un projet de recherche-création à la rencontre des géosciences et des neurosciences

Changement climatique : sciences, politique, société

Date: December 18, 2020
Time: 14h-17h
Location: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/266255181
By: Amy Dahan (historienne des sciences, CAK) avec Sandrine Maljean-Dubois (juriste, Université Aix-Marseille) & Hervé Le Treut (climatologue, ex-directeur de l’IPSL)
Title: Consensus : quels rôles dans l’action contre le changement climatique
Abtract:
Revisiter et Démêler la pelote des consensus titre commun à Amy Dahan (historienne des sciences et STS, CNRS)
Des travaux récents d’historiens, des écrits de journalistes (voir le livre de Nathanail Rich), comme la situation actuelle du débat politique public sur le changement climatique, incitent à revisiter  les divers consensus obtenus dans le Régime du Changement climatique, au cours des soixante dernières années. On reviendra sur les interactions entre consensus scientifique, experts, politique.
et Sandrine Maljean-Dubois (juriste, CNRS)
Si le consensus scientifique joue un rôle majeur dans la «  fabrique » du consensus politique, ce dernier est ensuite formalisé dans des instruments juridiques, au premier rang desquels l’Accord de Paris. Le consensus juridique est ici à la fois une procédure de prise de décision et le résultat de cette procédure.
On reviendra sur la portée de l’engagement international des États et, en particulier, sur l’élément de liaison que constituent désormais les procès climatiques dans la chaine – complexe et discontinue – (la pelote?) des consensus.
Quelles questions pour quel consensus (ou l’inverse)
? par Hervé Le Treut (climatologue, IPSL)
L’alerte sur le changement climatique, la mise en place d’accords internationaux, impliquent la définition nécessaire d’une forme de consensus qui soit activable de manière concrète. Parmi les difficultés induites, cependant, il en est une qui est souvent oubliée: la vitesse avec laquelle le monde physique se transforme. Il n’est plus possible aujourd’hui de penser les enjeux environnementaux de la même manière qu’il y a vingt ans,  ni d’ignorer les autres transitions. Le consensus doit être évolutif.

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: December 15, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Audrey Bonnelye (GFZ)
Title: Deformation in clay rich rocks : Multi-scale experiments

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: December 14, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/443148237
By: Sun Chao (ENS-PSL / Université du Pétrole de Pékin)
Title: Effect of mechanical compaction and biphasic saturation on the frequency dependence of elastic wave velocities in porous rock
Abstract: The aim of this thesis is to investigate the dispersion of elastic wave velocities in porous and saturated rocks. An introduction is given in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 presents two stress-strain devices, which can both capture the evolution of the Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio in the seismic frequency band. In addition, we analyzed the resonance effect of the apparatus using a numerical modeling approach. In particular, the numerical model indicated that a modification of the shaker boundary can move the first resonance frequency to higher frequency. Using this method, the frequency-band of the apparatus installed in Beijing was improved to 1-2000 Hz compared to the original ones of 1-100 Hz. On the other hand, we were able to show that the apparatus installed in Paris have similar resonance contaminations but at frequency higher than 1000 Hz. In addition, this second apparatus was modified to cut-off the pore fluid dead volumes using new ‘micro-valves’. Chapter 3 presents a generalized global-drainage-flow model based on the three-dimensional diffusion equation. In addition, the three-dimensional model can also be used to predict the influence of the « dead volume » on the dispersion. In the chapter 4, we investigated the influence of microscopic heterogeneity on the global flow and local flow at the scale of strain gauges. The observation of the local flow is influenced by the position of the strain gauges. It is due to that although the sample is homogeneous in terms of porosity and crack density, it is not the case in terms of crack aspect ratio, which may slightly vary along the sample. A 3D diffusion model coupled with a simple squirt model was built to further interpret the data. In the chapter 5, we investigate the effect of mechanical compaction on squirt-flow. The Bleurswiller with a porosity of 25% was mechanically compacted through a triaxial cell, and a stress-strain device was used to measure Young modulus dispersion and attenuation. Measurements show that pore collapse and grain crushing increase crack-fraction and the mean crack aspect ratio. The critical frequency of the squirt-flow therefore moves towards higher frequencies. As a consequence, for the compacted sandstone, Gassmann equation can be applied to wider frequencies, even to the logging band. These results have potential applications in reservoir monitoring, well-log interpretation, and time-lapse seismic analysis. Finally, in the chapter 6, we conducted an experiment to investigate the influence of saturation on the elastic wave velocities. An Indiana limestone was chosen due to that no dispersion related to squirt flow has been observed in the sample. Two saturation method-imbibition and drainage-were used to saturate the sample. Only for the drainage case, a significant attenuation and dispersion are observed. This is the consequence of the fluid distribution. In the drainage case, as the saturation increase, the critical frequency moves to lower frequencies. Finally, a model was built in the frame of Biot’s theory to predict these last measurements.
Jury: Professeur Ba (Hohai University) : Rapporteur
Dr Sarout (CSIRO) : Rapporteur
Pr. Leroy (Imperial College) : Examinateur
Dr. Adelinet (IFPEN) : Examinateur
Pr. Gueguen (ENS) : Examinateur
Pr. Tang (China University of Petroleum) : Examinateur
Pr. Wang (China Unversity of Petroleum) : Co-directeur de thèse
Dr Fortin (ENS/CNRS) : Directeur de thèse

Laboratoire du LMD-ENS

Date: Decembre 14, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Mounia Mostefaoui (LMD-ENS)
Title: Évaluer le respect des engagements des Parties dans le cas de l’Accord de Paris
Abstract: The Paris Agreement within the UNFCCC was based on a bottom-up voluntary commitments of countries submitted their Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDC) regarding reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. INDCs become NDCs (Nationally Determined Contributions) after ratification. It resulted in the participation of not less than 197 Parties at the negotiation table, with the aim to follow the IPCC recommendations for mitigation by “keeping a global temperature rise this century below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature elevation below 1.5 °C.”
The case of the Paris Agreement on climate change is therefore quite unique because almost two hundred parties are invited to freely agree on processes to tackle a common threat for life on earth, without the legal provisions contained in a document like a “Protocol” as for the Kyoto Protocol.
Our research question is how to get compliance without legally-binding possible international enforcement in the case of the Paris Agreement, and the associated role of science. Our methodology is based from an original inductive research approach exploiting interviews with about 50 actors chosen for their experience and involvement on this topic. We will discuss our experience within three COPs and present some favorable conditions for getting compliance without enforcement.

Changement climatique : sciences, politique, société

Date: December 11, 2020
Time: 14h-17h
Location: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/266255181
By: Jean-Paul Maréchal (économiste, Université de Paris-Saclay), Cédric Philibert (économiste, expert questions énergétiques, IFRI) & Pierre Charbonnier (philosophe, CNRS)
Title: Le Changement climatique vu de Chine
Abstract:
La lutte contre le changement climatique et la transition énergétique chinoise par Jean-Paul Maréchal (économiste, Université de Paris-Saclay)
Depuis quelques années, la position de Pékin dans les négociations climatiques internationales a radicalement changé. Longtemps rétive à tout engagement international, la Chine se présente désormais comme garante de l’application de l’Accord de Paris, dont elle a d’ailleurs permis l’adoption. L’objet de cette intervention sera d’analyser dans une optique d’économie politique internationale en quoi cette nouvelle attitude a partie liée avec la transition énergétique chinoise. Après avoir fait le point sur l’évolution et la structure de la consommation énergétique chinoise depuis les années 1970 on analysera les raisons du changement de position vis-à-vis du thème du changement climatique intervenu au milieu de la décennie 2000. Enfin, on s’interrogera sur la capacité chinoise à atteindre la « neutralité carbone » en 2060.
En Chine, les soviets plus l’électricité par Cédric Philibert (économiste, expert questions énergétiques, IFRI)
L’objectif d’émissions nettes nulles de gaz à effet de serre en 2060 fixé à la Chine par Xi Jinping n’est pas techniquement impossible, mais les difficultés politiques sont considérables.
Le China Renewable Energy Outlook du Centre National pour les Énergies Renouvelables montre le rôle central de l’électrification pour substituer les renouvelables aux fossiles dans tous les secteurs, et notamment l’industrie, y compris via la production d’hydrogène vert. Lénine l’avait pressenti en 1919: le communisme, c’est le gouvernement des soviets plus l’électricité.
Climat et pouvoir politique : comment comprendre la stratégie chinoise ? par Pierre Charbonnier (philosophe, CNRS)

Laboratoire du LMD-ENS

Date: December 7, 2020
Time: 17h !!!
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Lia Siegelman (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD)
Title: Energetic submesoscale dynamics in the ocean interior
Abstract: This talk investigates submesoscale fronts (< 50 km size) and their link to oceanic vertical heat transport. To date, submesoscale motions are thought to be mainly trapped within the ocean surface mixed layer, and to be weak in the ocean interior. This is because, in the classical paradigm, motions below the mixed layer are broadly assumed to be in quasi-geostrophic balance, preventing the formation of strong buoyancy gradients at depth. This talk introduces a paradigm shift; based on a combination of high-resolution in situ CTD data collected by instrumented elephant seals, satellite observations of sea surface height, and high-resolution model outputs in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, we show that energetic submesoscale motions (i) are generated by the background mesoscale eddy field via frontogenesis processes, and (ii) are not solely confined to the ocean surface mixed layer but, rather, can extend in the ocean interior down to depths of 1 000 m. Deep-reaching submesoscale fronts are shown to drive an anomalous upward heat transport from the ocean interior back to the surface that is of comparable magnitude to air-sea fluxes. This effect can potentially alter oceanic heat uptake and will be strongest in eddy-rich regions such as the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, the Kuroshio Extension, and the Gulf Stream, all of which are key players in the climate system. As such, submesoscale fronts provide an important, yet unexplored, pathway for the transport of heat, chemical and biological tracers, between the ocean interior and the surface, with potential major implications for the biogeochemical and climate systems.

Département de Géosciences

Date: December 1st, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Samuel Abiven (ENS)
Title: Fire-derived organic carbon dynamics: degradation, stabilisation and transport in the watershed

Laboratoire du LMD-ENS

Date: November 30, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Stefano Berti (Unité de Mécanique de Lille, Univ. Lille)
Title: Lagrangian dispersion in upper-ocean turbulence models including mixed-layer instabilities
Abstract: Turbulence in the upper ocean at submesoscales (scales smaller than the deformation radius) plays an important role for the heat exchange with the atmosphere and for oceanic biogeochemistry. Its dynamics should strongly depend on the seasonal cycle and the associated mixed-layer instabilities. The latter are particularly relevant in winter and are responsible for the formation of energetic small scales that extend over the whole depth of the mixed layer. The knowledge of the transport properties of oceanic flows at depth, which is essential to understand the coupling between surface and interior dynamics, however, is still limited, due to the complexity of performing measurements below the surface.
In this talk, I will present a numerical work focused on Lagrangian pair dispersion in turbulent flows from a quasi-geostrophic model allowing for both thermocline and mixed-layer instabilities. We find that, in the presence of mixed-layer instabilities, the dispersion regime is local (meaning governed by eddies of the same size as the particle separation distance) from the surface down to depths comparable with that of the interface with the thermocline, while in their absence dispersion rapidly becomes nonlocal (i.e. dominated by the transport by the largest eddies) versus depth. We then identify the origin of such behavior in the existence of fine-scale energetic structures due to mixed-layer instabilities. We further discuss the effect of vertical shear on the Lagrangian particle spreading and address the correlation between the dispersion properties at the surface and at depth, which is relevant to assess the possibility of inferring the dynamical features of deeper flows from the more accessible (e.g. by satellite altimetry) surface ones.

Changement climatique : sciences, politique, société

Date: November 27, 2020
Time: 14h-17h
Location: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/266255181
By: François Gemenne (politiste, Université de Liège et Science-Po Paris) & Gilles Ramstein (paléoclimatologue, LSCE)
Title: Le rôle du climat dans les migrations, passé et futur
Abstract:
Le rôle du climat dans la dispersion de la lignée humaine : du passé lointain (Miocène) au futur (Anthropocène) par Gilles Ramstein (paléoclimatologue, LSCE)
Comment sommes-nous passés d’une situation où nos ancêtres les plus lointains, les grands singes (gorilles, chimpanzés et orangs-outans), étaient très inféodés au climat et à leur environnement en Afrique au début du Néogène, à une situation où nous sommes nous-mêmes les acteurs d’un changement climatique qui va également provoquer des migrations importantes ? Le but de ce séminaire est de montrer, sur de longues échelles de temps (du Miocène au dernier cycle glaciaire/interglaciaire) quelle a été l’influence des changements climatiques sur la dispersion de nos ancêtres. Nous terminerons l’exposé en montrant, sur des échelles bien plus courtes, que l’Anthropocène est et sera également le moteur important de migrations.
Nous étudierons trois phases particulières, lors desquelles les changements géologiques ont provoqué des modifications du climat, associées à la dispersion de nos ancêtres. D’abord, nous discuterons des changements climatiques qui ont accompagné la migration des grands singes, de leur berceau en Afrique tropicale (23 Ma) à l’Asie du sud-est (vers 11-7 Ma). Dans un second temps, nous nous intéresserons à l’aridification de l’Afrique et à l’augmentation de l’effet climatique des cycles de précession et des moussons sur la dispersion de nos ancêtres plus récents (de Toumaï, 7 Ma, à Lucy, 3 Ma). Enfin, nous nous intéresserons plus récemment aux conditions climatiques dans lesquelles s’est effectuée la colonisation de la planète par les Homo Sapiens lors du dernier cycle glaciaire/interglaciaire. Puis nous conclurons avec quelques considérations relatives aux migrations à l’Anthropocène.
Les réfugiés de l’Anthropocène par François Gemenne (politiste, Université de Liège et Science-Po Paris)

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: November 24, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Mathilde Tiennot (Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France)
Title: Approche en mécanique des matériaux pour l’analyse et la préservation des biens culturels

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: November 23, 2020
Time: 14h
Location: Lien visio TBA
By: Clément Soufflet (ENS)
Title: Étude des interactions des ondes de montagne piégées avec la couche limite
Abstract: Gravity waves forced by mountains contribute significantly to the dynamics of the atmosphere. On the one hand, through local phenomena such as downslope windstorms on the lee side of a relief which can cause considerable damage. On the other hand, when these gravity waves can propagate vertically, they transport a certain amount momentum through the atmosphere. When they break, they transfer this momentum to their environment, inducing a dynamical forcing on the large-scale flow, thus contributing to coupling the lower and upper atmospheric layers together. These dynamical forcings, called mountain gravity wave drag, are partly responsible for some large-scale atmospheric circulations.
Previous studies show that considering this topographic forcing significantly improves weather forecasts. Despite the increase in the resolution of numerical weather prediction models, these topographic forcings remain parameterised. The construction of these parameterizations is largely based on theoretical studies carried out in idealized cases allowing a better understanding of mountain wave dynamics.
In this context, the aim of these thesis works is to deepen the theoretical knowledge concerning the interactions between the flows forced by mountains and the atmospheric boundary layer. The focus here is on trapped mountain lee waves, which instead of propagating vertically in the atmosphere above the relief, remain confined at low levels and propagate horizontally downstream of the topography.
It is shown that in the linear case, when the incident wind near the surface is weak, the trapped lee waves are no longer induced by low-level confinement but are analogous to Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. They are conditioned by the dynamical stability of the near-surface flow and are favoured for values of the Richardson number J < 0.25. The appearance of trapped lee waves appears to be strongly related to the dynamic stability of the downstream flow, particularly when the incident wind is weak near the surface.
These results are then extended in the case where the boundary layer dynamics are represented in a simplified manner using a constant viscosity coefficient, the interactions between topography and mean flow are then evaluated by estimating momentum flux. In this case, trapped lee waves exert a drag on the mean flow at low levels, but this is small compared to the form drag due to boundary layer dynamics or the drag due to free vertically propagating gravity waves. Finally, flow stability plays again a central role and the transition between the form drag regime and the gravity wave drag regime appears for J ∼ 1.
Jury: Mme Pascale Bouruet-Aubertot (OCEAN), Présidente du jury
Mme Marie Lothon (Laboratoire d’Aérologie), Rapporteur
M. Aymeric Spiga (LMD), Examinateur
M. Anton Beljaars (ECMWF), Examinateur
M. Christophe Millet (CEA DAM), Rapporteur
M. Alexandre Paci (CNRM), Invité
M. François Lott (LMD), Directeur de thèse

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: November 17, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Julia Le Noe (Institut d’Écologie Sociale de Vienne, Autriche)
Title: Trajectoires de l’usage des sols et cycle du carbone en France (1850-2015) – Les sols à la croisée des enjeux climatiques, alimentaires et énergétiques

Changement climatique : sciences, politique, société

Date: November 13, 2020
Time: 14h-17h
Location: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/266255181
By: Laurent Bopp (climatologue, LMD-ENS) & Julien Rochette (directeur du programme Océan, IDDRI)
Title: Bouleversement des écosystèmes marins par le changement climatique : quels outils pour la protection de la haute mer ?
Abstracts:
Changement climatique et écosystèmes marins – impacts, projections et solutions par Laurent Bopp (climatologue, LMD ENS)
En absorbant une part importante de nos émissions anthropiques de carbone, et la grande majorité de l’énergie en excès dans le système climatique, l’océan modère la vitesse à laquelle le changement climatique se développe. Mais cette modération a des répercussions sur les conditions environnementales océaniques et en conséquence sur les écosystèmes marins. Acidification de l’océan, augmentation des températures et de la fréquence des vagues de chaleur océaniques, modification de la circulation océanique et des quantités d’éléments nutritifs disponibles pour le plancton, baisse de la teneur en oxygène de l’eau de mer sont quelques unes des manifestations du changement climatique dans l’océan. Les impacts de ces modifications sur la distribution des espèces et le fonctionnement des écosystèmes marins sont mis en évidence dans de nombreuses régions de l’océan mondial. Les projections climatiques montrent que ces impacts sur les écosystèmes océaniques pourraient être de plus en plus prégnants au cours du XX1ème siècle en fonction des scénarios d’émissions de gaz à effet de serre. Dans cet exposé, je présenterai quelques exemples clés de ces modifications des écosystèmes océaniques observées au cours des dernières décennies. Je discuterai de l’évolution potentielle de ces impacts et de quelques unes des conséquences sur les services rendus à nos sociétés par ces écosystèmes. Je terminerai en évoquant certaines des solutions évoquées pour minimiser les impacts du changement climatique sur les écosystèmes marins.
Intégrer les enjeux climatiques dans le futur traité sur la haute mer : une mission impossible ? par Julien Rochette (directeur du programme Océan de l’IDDRI)
Le processus d’élaboration d’un instrument international juridiquement contraignant portant sur la conservation et l’utilisation durable de la biodiversité marine des zones ne relevant pas de la juridiction nationale – plus communément désignées sous le terme « haute mer » – a été lancé fin 2017 par l’Assemblée générale des Nations unies et trois réunions de négociations ont jusqu’ici été organisées à New York. Initialement prévue en mars 2020, la quatrième réunion, censée aboutir à la finalisation du traité, a été reportée sine die pour cause de crise sanitaire mondiale. Pour l’heure, les discussions ont avant tout porté sur les quatre éléments du « Package Deal », cœur du futur traité, à savoir : (i) les ressources génétiques marines (RGM), y compris les questions relatives au partage des avantages liés à leur exploitation ; (ii) les mesures telles que les outils de gestion par zone (OGZ), notamment les aires marines protégées (AMP) ; (iii) les études d’impact environnemental (EIE) ; et (iv) le renforcement des capacités ainsi que le transfert de la technologie marine. Cette présentation proposera un état des lieux des négociations en cours, des forces en présence, des principaux défis et discutera de la manière dont le futur traité pourrait inclure les enjeux liés aux changements climatiques.

SoutenanceS – HDR

Date: November 12, 2020
Time: 13h
Location: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/633445093
By: Pierre Barré (ENS) & Lauric Cécillon (INRAE / ENS)
TitleS: « De la caractérisation du carbone organique persistant des sols à sa quantification » par Pierre Barré
« Indicateurs biogéochimiques pour une conservation durable du carbone et de la qualité du sol » par Lauric Cécillon
JuryS: le jury de Pierre Barré est composé de Luc Abbadie, Laurent Bopp, Claire Chenu, Jean-Luc Chotte, Fatima Laggoun, Philippe Peylin, Daniel Rasse ; et celui de Lauric Cécillon de Mickaël Aubert, François Baudin, Antonio Bispo, Céline Granjou, Florence Habets, Christine Hatté, Quentin Ponette, Cornelia Rumpel

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: November 10, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Elenora van Rijsingen (ENS)
Title: Unraveling the Seismotectonics of the Lesser Antilles Subduction Zone: Insights from Geodetic Observations

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: November 9, 2020
Time: 14h30
Location: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/639646133
By: Benoît Vittecoq (BRGM)
Title: Hydrogéophysique appliquée à la compréhension du fonctionnement hydrogéologique d’une île volcanique andésitique : la Martinique
Abstract:
La gestion de la ressource et l’approvisionnement en eau des populations des îles volcaniques, notamment de celles densément peuplées ayant des besoins importants, est une problématique majeure. Les connaissances hydrogéologiques des îles volcaniques andésitiques en particulier, telle que la Martinique, restent éparses et mal contraintes, ne permettant pas une gestion optimisée de leur ressource. Grâce aux données géophysiques électromagnétiques acquises à l’aide d’un dispositif héliporté (SkyTEM) ayant survolé l’ensemble de la Martinique, permettant de s’affranchir des difficultés d’accès, des fortes pentes et de la végétation tropicale, nous avons pu obtenir une imagerie de la résistivité du sous-sol de l’ensemble de l’île sur 200 à 300 m de profondeur. Ces données ont été couplées à des données géologiques et hydrogéologiques existantes dans des forages afin d’interpréter ces données de résistivité en termes de structure géologiques et de propriétés hydrogéologiques. Des modèles conceptuels hydrogéologiques adaptés, à l’échelle de l’aquifère et du bassin versant, sont ainsi proposés. Dans un dernier temps, la relation entre sismicité et déphasage entre marée terrestre et le niveau d’eau d’un forage est investiguée afin de quantifier l’évolution des propriétés hydrodynamiques dans le temps.
A l’échelle de l’aquifère, les écoulements souterrains sont chenalisés en raison d’une compartimentation de l’aquifère contraintes par les principales directions structurales régionales. Les compartiments les plus fracturés présentent les résistivités les plus faible et les transmissivités les plus fortes. Cette compartimentation et les contrastes de transmissivités protègent cet aquifère côtier des intrusions salines.
A l’échelle du bassin versant, pour des formations avec des âges compris entre 1 et 5.5 Ma, plus la formation est ancienne, plus sa résistivité est faible et plus sa perméabilité est élevée. Les structures géologiques et notamment les dômes andésitiques induisent des écoulements préférentiels avec une part significative de la pluie efficace s’infiltrant en profondeur. Ainsi, les bassins versants topographiques et hydrogéologiques peuvent avoir des limites différentes, de l’eau s’infiltrant dans un bassin versant topographique en amont pouvant en rejoindre un autre plus en aval.
Enfin, un modèle analytique permettant de calculer la perméabilité de l’aquifère à partir du déphasage entre les ondes de marées terrestres et les variations cycliques de niveaux d’eau enregistrées dans un forage a été développé. Les résultats obtenus montrent que la perméabilité de l’aquifère a été multipliée par 20 sur la période 2007-2019. Cette augmentation de la perméabilité résulte de la création de nouvelles fractures et du débourrage de fractures existantes induites par les contraintes dynamiques suite aux principaux séismes ressentis sur cette période. Nous démontrons également que les pluies extrêmes (Cyclones, tempêtes tropicales) contribuent aussi au débourrage des fractures. Une analyse comparative des perméabilités d’une quarantaine de forages met également en évidence une augmentation de la perméabilité au cours des âges géologiques corroborant ainsi la tendance observée sur une décennie. Ainsi, nous démontrons que la perméabilité des aquifères andésitiques de la Martinique augmente avec le temps en raison de l’activité sismique, induisant une fracturation et/ou un décolmatage régulier des aquifères.
Jury: Mai-Linh Doan (Université de Grenoble) – Rapporteur / Hervé Jourde (Université de Montpellier) – Rapporteur / Pierre Briole (ENS-PSL) – Examinateur / Alain Dassargue (Université de Liège) – Examinateur / Philippe Jousset (GFZ Potsdam) – Examinateur / Pierre Nehlig (BRGM) – Examinateur / Sophie Violette (SU & ENS-PSL) – Directrice de thèse

Département de Géosciences

Date: November 3, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Mathias Girel (Dept. Philo de l’ENS – Référent à l’intégrité scientifique à l’ENS) & Boris Barbour (IBENS – membre du comité intégrité scientifique de l’ENS)
Title: Intégrité scientifique : contextes local et global

Changement climatique : sciences, politique, société

Date: October 30, 2020
Time: 14h-17h
Location: Lien visio TBA
By: Davide Faranda (physicien des systèmes complexes, LSCE et LMD-ENS) & Hélène Guillemot (histoire et sociologie des sciences, CAK)
Title: La modélisation numérique dans l’expertise, pouvoirs et limites
Abstracts:
La modélisation numérique du climat, évolutions et questionnements par Hélène Guillemot (histoire et sociologie des sciences, CAK)
Seuls outils capables de nous projeter vers l’avenir du climat de notre planète, les modèles numériques occupent une place quasi hégémonique au cœur de l’expertise du changement climatique. Comment ont ils évolué au cours des décennies ? Leur développement obéit-il à des logiques scientifiques ou aussi politiques ? Quelle confiance peut-on accorder aux modèles de climat et à leurs prévisions ? Quels sont leurs pouvoirs, et leurs limites ? On abordera ces questions en s’appuyant sur l’histoire de la modélisation et de l’expertise climatique ainsi que sur l’analyse des pratiques des modélisateurs.
Potentialités et limites de la modélisation numérique des catastrophes par Davide Faranda (climatologue, LSCE)
La science donne-t-elle l’illusion que toute catastrophe peut être résolue par la technologie et que nous pouvons contrôler les événements de cette ampleur par de gros investissements économiques? La COVID19 et autres épidémies, les événements météorologiques extrêmes, les tremblements de terre, les impacts d’astéroïdes ainsi que les tempêtes magnétiques sont des phénomènes complexes caractérisés par de très faibles probabilités de se produire mais qui, une fois survenus, font courir un danger d’extinction pour notre espèce. Ces événements extrêmes sont liés aux non-linéarités de la dynamique sous-jacente des phénomènes naturels. Ils sont caractérisés par un comportement à court terme hautement imprévisible et par des projections à long terme soumises à de grandes incertitudes. Dans cet exposé, je discuterai des racines statistiques et dynamiques communes de ces phénomènes, en soulignant leurs singularités et l’impossibilité technique pour l’humanité de s’adapter efficacement à leur occurrence. Je montrerai divers exemples tirés de la récente épidémie de COVID19, du tremblement de terre/tsunami de Fukushima et de certains impacts futurs prévus des phénomènes climatiques sur la santé publique.

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: October 20, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Alex Hughes (IPGP)
Title: Submarine normal fault scarp evolution with links to seismicity: Insights from high-resolution bathymetry data in the Lesser Antilles

Changement climatique : sciences, politique, société

Date: October 16, 2020
Time: 14h-17h
Location: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/266255181
By: Louis-Gaëtan Giraudet (économiste, CIRED) & Selma Tilikete (doctorante en sciences politiques, Université Paris 8 et CAK)
Title: Convention Citoyenne pour le Climat : quels liens entre citoyens et expertise ?
Abstracts:
Le lien entre citoyens et experts dans la construction des mesures du groupe « Se Loger » par Louis-Gaëtan Giraudet (économiste, CIRED)
L’ampleur et la technicité du mandat de la Convention Citoyenne pour le Climat créent un incontournable besoin d’expertise. Pour importante qu’elle fût, l’expertise s’est-elle exercée dans le respect de la créativité et de la liberté de choix des citoyens? Nous abordons cette question en étudiant la nature de l’expertise à laquelle ont été exposés les citoyens et la façon dont les experts ont accompagné les citoyens au-delà du simple exposé des faits et avis. Nous nous intéressons au groupe « Se Loger », qui traite d’un secteur — le bâtiment — caractérisé par une forte inertie socio-technique. Nous observons que l’information donnée a permis aux citoyens d’appréhender le problème dans toute sa complexité, et que le groupe a largement repris à son compte les solutions présentées par les experts. Cette approche a conduit le groupe à proposer la mesure généralement considérée comme la plus ambitieuse de la Convention: rendre obligatoire la rénovation énergétique globale des bâtiments d’ici 2040. Le processus a été marqué par une certaine anxiété des citoyens face à l’injonction contradictoire inhérente à l’impératif de proposer des mesures ambitieuses et réalistes.
Entre technique et politique : la fabrique des propositions de la Convention Citoyenne pour le Climat par Selma Tilikete (doctorante en sciences politiques, Université Paris 8 et CAK)
Quelles formes ont pu prendre les rapports entre citoyen-nes et expert-es dans l’élaboration des propositions de la Convention Citoyenne pour le Climat ? Quel est l’apport explicite ou implicite de citoyen-nes tiré-es au sort dans la construction de mesures pour lutter contre le réchauffement climatique, notamment par rapport aux expert-es du sujet ? Nous proposons d’entrer dans les détails de l’élaboration des propositions de la CCC, en distinguant cinq types de mesures, qui engagent des relations citoyen-nes/expert-es distinctes et rendent compte du travail de démarcation entre le technique et le politique tout au long du processus.

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: October 13, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Sylvain Michel (ENS)
Title: Twelve years of seismic and aseismic slip along the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: October 9, 2020
Time: 14h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/596786141
By: Clément Alibert (ENS)
Title: Contrôles physiques, chimiques et biologiques des flux de gaz à l’interface sol-atmosphère
Abstract: La maitrise des flux de gaz du sol vers l’atmosphère est d’importance pour plusieurs questions sociétales à forts enjeux. La mesure et l’extrapolation de ces flux est un exercice complexe du fait de leur variabilité spatiale et temporelle. Cette variabilité est liée aux nombreux processus, souvent intriqués, qui contrôlent le transport des gaz dans les sols et à l’interface sol-atmosphère.
Un dispositif novateur a été développé au sein d’une plateforme expérimentale pour permettre l’étude des flux de gaz en surface d’une colonne de sol placée en conditions contrôlées, avec un suivi à long terme et à haute résolution de nombreux paramètres. Les mécanismes physiques, chimiques et biologiques responsables des variations des flux de gaz à l’interface sol-atmosphère peuvent ainsi être appréhendés séparément.
Cette étude s’est particulièrement attachée aux effets du métabolisme des plantes (évapotranspiration, respiration et photosynthèse) ainsi qu’à la teneur en eau et à la pression barométrique. Ces mécanismes jouent sur le gradient de pression qui contrôle le transport advectif des gaz. Un flux de gaz constant à la base d’un sol peut ainsi montrer des variations transitoires significatives sur des échelles de temps allant de plusieurs heures à plusieurs jours.
Un travail de modélisation numérique a été initié bien qu’aucun code ne soit actuellement en mesure de rendre compte du transport diphasique en présence de fronts air/eau avec évaporation. Les nombreux résultats expérimentaux obtenus permettront de valider les développements nécessaires.
Jury: Corinne Loisy (ENSEGID Bordeaux) : rapporteure / Laurent Charlet (ISTerre Grenoble) : rapporteur / Florence Habets (ENS) : examinatrice / Marina Gillon (UAPV-INRAE) : examinatrice / Samuel Abiven (ENS) : invite / Éric Pili (CEA/ DAM Île-De-France) : directeur de thèse / Pierre Barré (ENS) : co-encadrant de thèse

Département de Géosciences

Date: October 6, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Clément Imbert (University of Warwick)
Title: Les questions environnementales dans les pays en développement : que dit la science économique ?

Soutenance – HDR

Date: October 2, 2020
Time: 13h30
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / inscription visio : https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7171800297353864462
By: Bertrand Guenet (ENS)
Title: De l’importance des matières organiques des sols dans les échanges de matières entre les différentes composantes du système Terre
Abstract: Depuis mon recrutement au CNRS en octobre 2013, je me suis attaché à étudier la dynamique des matières organiques du sol et plus particulièrement du carbone organique du sol (COS) notamment en me focalisant sur les interactions avec le climat. Cela est passé principalement par l’usage d’outils de modélisation. Parmi ces outils de modélisation, le modèle de surface ORCHIDEE développé à l’Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL) a été mon outil principal. J’ai participé à de nombreux développements du modèle pour mieux représenter la complexité de la dynamique du COS. J’ai notamment introduit des compartiments de carbone organique dissout (COD) pouvant être soumis à des exports latéraux. J’ai également participé à proposer une représentation de l’érosion et des flux de carbone organique particulaire (COP) adaptée aux contraintes d’un modèle global. Néanmoins, je me suis également attaché à ne pas travailler uniquement avec le modèle ORCHIDEE et j’ai notamment travaillé sur des approches plus locales et/ou théoriques. Etant intéressé par les flux latéraux entre systèmes terrestres et aquatiques, j’ai développé des modèles de décomposition du COD en système aquatique d’eau douce. Enfin, j’ai pris une attention toute particulière à ne pas être un modélisateur exclusif et j’ai donc également pris part à plusieurs études travaillant uniquement à partir de données d’observations et/ou obtenues en laboratoire. Ces différentes activités ont pu avoir lieu grâce à une participation forte à des projets de recherches nationaux et internationaux dont certains que j’ai portés.
Mon projet de recherche s’inscrit dans la continuité mais se veut plus ambitieux. Quatre points principaux le composent. (i) aller vers un couplage effectif des modèles de surface terrestre et de biogéochimie marine au sein du modèle couplé de l’IPSL. Pour ce faire, je souhaite regrouper au sein de la version principale d’ORCHIDEE les différents développements auxquels j’ai participé afin de bénéficier de l’environnement de simulation du modèle couplé climat/carbone de l’IPSL. (ii) Sortir du paradigme des modèles en compartiment non mesurables. En effet, le COS est distribué le long d’un continuum de dégradabilité et non au sein de compartiments homogènes tels que nous les représentons actuellement. Des approches mathématiques ont été proposées il y a plusieurs décennies mais pour des raisons diverses elles n’ont pas eu le succès des approches par compartiment. Je souhaite me baser sur ces approches en continuum afin de mieux représenter la diversité des situations mais je souhaite également proposer en parallèle une approche utilisant des compartiments mesurables se basant sur des approches originales. Cela permettra une amélioration à plus court terme des modèles actuels. (iii) Appliquer le modèle ORCHIDEE pour estimer les impacts de politique de gestion. Cette aspect se divisera en deux sous parties, l’une visant à estimer les effets de la politique du 4 pour mille sur diverses variables prédites par le modèle (flux de CO2, N2O, etc.). L’autre, qui nécessitera des travaux de développement, est probablement plus risquée car elle ambitionne d’apporter des contraintes écotoxicologique au modèle en se focalisant avant tout sur l’effet de la contamination en métaux lourd en Europe. (iv) Enfin, je souhaite conserver une part significative de mes travaux de recherche qui n’utilise que des données d’observations et pas de modélisation. Ceci passera par deux points également. Le premier visera à mieux comprendre le rôle de la physique du sol sur les flux de gaz à effet de serre en provenance du sol et le second s’intéressera à l’impact du changement climatique sur certains caractères pédologiques des sols tels que la texture ou le pH.

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: September 29, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Emma Gregory (IPGP)
Title: Internal structure of the Romanche oceanic transform fault: insights into the nature of slow-slipping transforms

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: September 22, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Magali Riesner (CEA)
Title: Evidence for Crustal Extension on Secondary Faults in the Main Himalayan Thrust Hanging Wall during the Latest Great Himalayan Earthquakes
Abstract: The largest (M8+) known earthquakes in the Himalayas have ruptured the upper locked segment of the Main Himalayan Thrust zone, producing slip at the surface along the Main Frontal Thrust (MFT) at the range front. However, out-of-sequence active structures have received less attention. One of the most impressive examples of such faults is the active fault that generally follows the surface trace of the Main Boundary Thrust (MBT), which has generated a clear geomorphological signature along the Himalayan belt.
The recent activity of this fault is clear along a    ̴120 km-stretch of this boundary fault between the Siwaliks and the Lesser Himalaya in western Nepal between the towns of Surkhet and Gorahi.  We first use a high-resolution Digital Elevation Model generated from triplets of very high-resolution Pleiades images in order to map the fault scarp and its geomorphological lateral variation. Across most of its length, this fault is reactivated as a normal fault and associated to cumulated scarps up to   ̴25 meters-high. This suggests that several earthquakes ruptured the hanging wall of the MHT accommodating crustal extension. We excavated a 17 meters-long trench at the toe of the scarp in the village of Sukhetal exhuming the fault plane and two colluvial wedges. Radiocarbon dating analysis of 19 detrital charcoals suggests that the last slip event on this fault occurred in the early 16th century. This rupture could be related with the great 1505 earthquake (M 8+) that devastated the region, and was also found along thrust fault escarpments of the MFT.  This suggests that several faults branching at depth on the Main decollement at the front of the megathrust system could be reactivated within a short time period with opposite motions.

Département de Géosciences

Date: September 15, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314 / https://www.gotomeet.me/SeminairesGeosciencesENS
By: Frédéric Hélein (Université de Paris)
Title: Où va l’édition scientifique

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: September 14, 2020
Time: 14h
Location: https://www.gotomeet.me/FabioDANDREA
By: Émilien Jolly (ENS)
Title: Effets de l’Amplification Arctique sur la circulation atmosphérique des moyennes latitudes et les vagues de froid en hiver à partir de modélisation numérique idéalisée
Abstract: L’Amplification Arctique (AA) correspond au réchauffement atmosphérique plus fort dans l’Arctique qu’aux latitudes moyennes, et ses effets sur la circulation atmosphérique sont discutés dans la littérature. Son impact sur les ondes de Rossby et les vagues de froid en hiver aux latitudes moyennes est analysée en utilisant un modèle quasi-géostrophique sec en comparant des simulations longues. L’une correspond à la climatologie hivernale des 30 dernières années, et pour l’autre un schéma d’AA est ajouté. Par divers diagnostiques, une diminution de la vitesse de phase des ondes et une augmentation modérée de la variance basse fréquence sont observés aux latitudes moyennes, en lien avec un affinement du jet. Dans un cadre simplifié, l’impact de la largeur du jet sur les ondes est plus particulièrement étudié. Par endroit, ces changements modifient les vagues de froid et peuvent compenser le réchauffement en terme de nombre de vague de froid. Enfin, la variabilité du schéma de l’AA, et ses conséquences sur ce raisonnement, sont présentés. Les différentes manières de compter l’AA sont perméables aux influences du reste du changement climatique, qui peut avoir des influences contraires.
Jury: Emilia Sanchez Gomez (CERFACS, Toulouse) – Rapportrice / Gabriele Messori (Upsalla University, Suède) – Rapporteur / Nili Harnik (Tel Aviv University, Israel) – Examinatrice / Francis Codron (LOCEAN, Paris) – Examinateur / Julien Cattiaux (CNRM, Toulouse) – Examinateur / Fabio D’Andrea (LMD, Paris) – Directeur de thèse / Gwendal Rivière (LMD, Paris) – Directeur de thèse / Sebastien Fromang (LSCE, Gif-sur-Yvette) – Invité

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: July 6, 2020
Time: 10h
Location: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/224935429
By: Hanjun Yin (ENS – Univ. of Petroleum-Beijing)
Title: Experimental and theoretical studies of elastic properties of sandstones at different frequency bands
Abstract:  This dissertation conducted laboratory measurements on different kinds of sandstone to study the frequency dependence of elastic moduli and corresponding attenuation at a broad frequency band. The selected sandstones with varied pore structures were a tight sandstone with a crack–pore microstructure, a Berea sandstone, and a clay-bearing Thüringen sandstone. Measurements were done in dry-, glycerin- and water-saturated conditions by two experimental facilities, which both combines the forced oscillation method (~10 Hz) with ultrasonic transmission method (~1 MHz). For all our samples, the elastic moduli for the dry case show no frequency dependence. However, moduli dispersion with associated frequency-dependent attenuation can be clearly observed for samples under water or glycerin saturation, and were in response to the drained–undrained transition and squirt flow. These measurements illustrated that squirt flow can potentially be a source of moduli dispersion and corresponding attenuation across a wide range of frequencies because of its sensitivity to small variations in the rock microstructure, especially in the aspect ratio of micro-cracks or grain contacts. There is a clear shear weakening for Thüringen sandstone, which is mainly caused by the reduction of surface energy due to fluid-solid chemical interaction. A fluid substitution scheme was developed based on the concept of a triple pore structure to better account for the squirt flow effects. The estimated results were generally in agreement with the experimental results.
Jury: Angus I. BEST (National Oceanography Centre – Southampton) – Reviewer / Mickaele LE RAVALEC (IFPEN) – Reviewer / Satish SINGH (IPGP) – Examiner / Jérôme FORTIN (Laboratoire de Géologie ENS) – Examiner / Shangxu WANG (China University of Petroleum-Beijing) – Co-Director / Yves GUÉGUEN (Laboratoire de Géologie ENS) – Director

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: June 26, 2020
Time: 14h
Location: https://www.gotomeet.me/CarolineMULLER/sara
By: Sara SHAMEKH (ENS)
Title: L’impact des températures de surface de la mer sur l’agrégation des nuages convectifs profonds
Abstract: Cette thèse examine l’impact des hétérogénéités de température de surface de la mer (SST) sur l’agrégation des nuages convectifs, à l’aide de simulations 3D de l’équilibre radiatif-convectif. Les hétérogénéités de température étudiées sont soit imposées, soit interactives. Dans le premier cas, un point chaud de rayon R et d’anomalie de température dT est introduit à la surface. Le point chaud accélère l’agrégation et étend les valeurs de SST pour lesquelles la convection agrège. L’augmentation de l’instabilité sur le point chaud renforce la convection et la circulation grande échelle, forçant la subsidence et l’assèchement à l’extérieur du point chaud. Une anomalie suffisamment large ou chaude provoque l’agrégation même sans rétroactions radiatives.Dans le cas d’hétérogénéités interactives, l’océan est modélisé par une couche de température moyenne constante mais variant dans l’espace. La SST interactive ralentit l’agrégation, d’autant plus que la couche océanique est peu profonde.L’anomalie de SST dans les régions sèches est d’abord positive, s’opposant à la circulation divergente dans la couche limite, connue pour favoriser l’auto-agrégation. À un seuil de sécheresse plus élevé, l’anomalie devient négative et favorise cette circulation. La circulation peu profonde est corrélée à la vitesse d’agrégation. Elle est due à une haute pression, elle-même liée aux anomalies de SST et au refroidissement radiatif de la couche limite. L’inclusion d’un cycle diurne dans les simulations avec SST interactive accélère l’apparition de zones sèches et l’agrégation pour les couches océaniques peu profondes, réduisant ainsi la dépendance de l’agrégation à la profondeur de la couche océaniques.
Jury: Francoise GUICHARD (CNRM, Météo France, Toulouse) – Rapportrice / Adrian TOMPKINS (ICTP, Trieste) –  Rapporteur / Sandrine BONY (LMD, Sorbone Université) – Examinatrice / Christopher HOLLOWAY (University of Reading, Reading) – Examinateur / Jean-Pierre CHABOUREAU (Université de Toulouse) – Examinateur / Caroline MULLER (LMD, ENS) – Directrice / Jean-Philippe DUVEL (LMD, ENS) – Co-directeur / Fabio D’ANDREA (LMD, ENS) – Co-directeur

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: June 9, 2020
Time: 14h
Location: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/545586101
By: Sung-Ping CHANG (ENS)
Title: Impact des zones de subduction environnantes sur l’évolution tectonique de la Mer de Chine méridionale
Abstract: Plate convergence is accommodated by subduction process, and may in turn influence the downgoing plate and create new basins. This study focuses on the basin evolution of a unique marginal sea located in the South China Sea to evaluate the relation with the adjacent Proto-South China Sea subduction zone in terms of sedimentary infill and crustal structures in the Cenozoic time. The basin has a V shape and its rifted margins display a hyper-extended continental crust whose extensional direction varied from North-South to Northwest-Southeast. The coincident differential closure of the adjacent Proto South China Sea and the lateral variation of the crustal nature and thickness created a rotation of the continental margin. These observation allow us to explore some of the boundary forces which are inherent to geodynamics of subduction.
Jury: Philippe Huchon (Sorbonne Université) – Rapporteur / Frederic Mouthereau (Université Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier) – Rapporteur / Gwenn Péron-Pindivic (Norges Geologiske Undersøkelse) – Examinatrice / Javier Escartin (ENS) – Examinateur / Geoffroy Mohn (Université de Cergy-Pontoise) – Examinateur / Manuel Pubellier (ENS) – Directeur / Matthias Delescluse (ENS) – Co-Directeur / Jean Letouzey (Sorbonne Université) – Invité

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: June 11, 2020
Time: 14h
Location: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/618314389
By: Valentin TSCHANNEN (ENS)
Title: Applications de l’apprentissage profond pour le traitement et l’interprétation sismique
Abstract: Acquérir des connaissances sur la géologie de la subsurface terrestre grâce à l’imagerie sismique est un processus long et parfois fastidieux. De nombreux algorithmes sont utilisés pour transformer le signal, atténuer le bruit et aider à interpréter l’image. Ces algorithmes sont conçus par des experts et nécessitent d’être soigneusement paramétrés. De plus, de nombreuses tâches doivent être effectuées manuellement par les géoscientifiques lorsque les algorithmes ne parviennent pas à fournir de bons résultats. Ces dernières années, l’apprentissage profond, un sous-domaine de l’intelligence artificielle, a pris une grande importance. Il a été
démontré que les modèles d’apprentissage surpassent les algorithmes traditionnels dans de nombreuses applications à travers un grand nombre de disciplines scientifiques. Ils permettent également d’automatiser certains processus qui n’étaient jusque-là réalisables que par des humains. Cependant, il peut être difficile de remplir les conditions nécessaires pour exploiter leur potentiel. Dans cette thèse, nous identifions les principaux obstacles à l’utilisation de l’apprentissage profond, notamment ceux de l’incertitude sur l’interprétation des données et de la dépendance de l’apprentissage en exemples fournis par des experts, et proposons une série de méthodologies visant à les surmonter. Nous démontrons la validité et la faisabilité de nos méthodes sur un ensemble de problèmes d’interprétation et de traitement sismique.
Jury: Alessandra Ribodetti (Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis) – Rapportrice / Nicolas Thome (Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers) – Rapporteur / Hervé Chauris (Mines ParisTech) – Examinateur / Alain Rabaute (Sorbonne Université) – Examinateur / Éléonore Stutzmann (Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris) – Examinatrice / Matthias Delescluse (École Normale Supérieure) – Directeur / Norman Ettrich (Fraunhofer Society) – Invité / Janis Keuper (Offenburg University & Fraunhofer Society) – Invité

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: March 11, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Salle SERRE
By: Andrew Friedman (Univ Edinburgh)
Title: Decadal behavior of the interhemispheric SST contrast: contextualizing the late 1960s – early 1970s shift
Abstract: The SST contrast between the northern and southern hemispheres influences the location of the ITCZ and the intensity of the monsoon systems. From the late 1960s — early 1970s, the interhemispheric SST contrast experienced a rapid north–south shift, which had pronounced impacts on rainfall in the Sahel and other regions. I will discuss results from a detection & attribution study using CMIP5 models to quantify the contributions of external forcing and unforced internal variability to the interhemispheric SST contrast during the instrumental period (1881–2012). The late 1960s – early 1970s shift is found to be largely due to internal variability, with a smaller contribution from anthropogenic aerosols. Some models are able to produce such large-magnitude shifts in their control simulations, suggesting that the late 1960s – early 1970s shift is within the range of background climate variability. I will also discuss some of the patterns producing large-magnitude interhemispheric SST shifts.

CERES

Date: March 3, 2020
Time: 14h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Régis Briday (UPEC) & Roland Séférian (Météo France)
Title: Géoingénierie, stockage du carbone et autres solutions « interventionnistes » pour lutter contre le changement climatique : quels espaces pour en débattre ?

Département de Géosciences

Date: March 3, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Mathilde PASCAL (Santé Publique France)
Title: Changement climatique : le plus grand risque, et la plus grande opportunité pour la santé publique du 21ème siècle

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: February 26, 2020
Time: 14h – UNUSUAL SCHEDULE
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Sylvia Sullivan (KIT – IMK)
Title: From environmental moisture to precipitation intensity in tropical convective systems
Abstract: In the tropics, the majority of high-intensity precipitation comes from the organization of multiple convective cells into convective systems (CS). Environmental moisture can affect these precipitation intensities in a multiplicity of ways. For example, while precipitation onset occurs beyond a threshold in column water vapor content, lower tropospheric drying can also enhance instability and ascent rate. We investigate these moisture-precipitation relationships for tropical CS semi-observationally with satellite data and high-resolution reanalysis values. In particular, the long duration of these datasets allows us to establish robust shifts in the precipitation intensity distribution with the El Niño Southern Oscillation and to explain them on the basis of a vertical momentum budget. Given the role of free tropospheric relative humidity in this budget, we proceed to examine how the relations of precipitation intensity, saturation deficit, and instability differ with spatiotemporal scale and in idealized simulations versus observations. Organized convective activity can affect not just local but also remote precipitation intensities, and we give an outlook on the utility of causal algorithms here.

Soutenance – HDR

Date: February 26, 2020
Time: 10h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Matthias Delescluse (LG-ENS)
Title: Apports de l’imagerie sismique marine pour l’étude de l’activité passée et présente des failles
Abstract: L’imagerie sismique marine permet de caractériser la géométrie des structures géologiques et nous renseigne au premier ordre sur la nature des roches de subsurface. Les différentes techniques d’imagerie permettent ainsi de cartographier les structures et de mieux comprendre leur formation résultant de déformations intégrées au cours des temps géologiques. En Mer de Chine du sud, une analyse conjointe de données de sismiques réfraction et réflexion longue flûte, couvrant toute l’épaisseur crustale, permet de détailler une chronologie relative des phases extensives lors du rifting et confirme l’importance des contacts pré-existants dans la localisation de la déformation finie. En revanche, même si la distribution et le style de la sismicité sont dans certaines régions également influencés par l’héritage structural (e.g. l’Océan indien), il est plus délicat de tirer des enseignements de la complexité structurale sur l’activité à plus court terme des failles. Les zones de subduction en sont l’illustration la plus flagrante: les structures de la plaque plongeante et de l’avant arc sont abondamment discutées et reconnues comme influençant le comportement sismogénique de l’interface, au même niveau cependant que d’autres paramètres comme les fluides, le régime thermique ou la sédimentation. On résumera ici les apports de l’imagerie sismique moderne permettant notamment de suivre en continu la réflectivité de l’interface de subduction jusqu’à la zone de transition asismique. On discutera les nouvelles possibilités d’étude du comportement des zones de subduction qui en découlent au travers d’exemples en Alaska et d’un projet de campagne au Chili centré sur l’imagerie des variations latérales (le long de la fosse) de la géométrie et des propriétés de l’interface.
Jury: Nicolas Coltice (École normale supérieure) – Correspondant HDR / Tim Minshull (University of Southampton) – Rapporteur / Stéphane Mazzotti (Université de Montpellier) – Rapporteur / Frauke Klingelhoefer (Ifremer Brest) – Rapportrice / Carole Petit (Université de Nice) – Examinatrice / Dieter Franke (BGR Hannover) – Examinateur / Javier Escartin (CNRS-ENS) – Examinateur

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: February 25, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Laurent Métivier (IGN)
Title: Reference frames, glacial isostatic adjustment and climate changes

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: February 21, 2020
Time: 14h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Ludivine Conte (ENS / CEA)
Title: Emissions océaniques de gaz d’intérêt pour la chimie atmosphérique – Modélisation des dynamiques océaniques du CO, de l’isoprène et du DMS
Abstract: L’activité phytoplanctonique est à l’origine de la production dans l’océan de composés volatils, qui, une fois émis dans l’atmosphère, ont un impact sur sa capacité oxydante, la formation d’aérosols et la régulation du climat. Les émissions océaniques de la plupart de ces composés sont néanmoins mal connues en raison d’un faible nombre d’observations in situ et d’un manque de connaissance dans les processus océaniques en jeu. Dans un premier temps, je me suis intéressée aux cycles océaniques du monoxyde de carbone (CO) et de l’isoprène (C5H8). Afin de ré-évaluer leurs émissions vers l’atmosphère, les processus de production et de consommation de ces gaz dans la colonne d’eau ont été intégrés au modèle 3-D de circulation océanique et de biogéochimie marine NEMO-PISCES. En parallèle, des compilations de concentrations océaniques mesurées in situ et de résultats de laboratoire ont été réalisées à partir de la littérature afin de mieux contraindre ces processus océaniques. Dans un second temps, je me suis intéressée aux réponses des émissions océaniques de CO, isoprène et sulfure de diméthyle (DMS) au changement climatique. Ce travail devrait permettre à terme d’intégrer ces cycles dans un modèle du système terre, couplant biogéochimie marine et chimie atmosphérique, afin de mieux quantifier le rôle potentiel de ces interactions sur l’évolution de la chimie atmosphérique et du climat.
Jury: Inga Hense (University of Hamburg) – Rapporteuse / Véronique Garçon (LEGOS, Toulouse) – Rapporteuse / Agnès Borbon (LaMP, Clermont-Ferrand) – Examinatrice / Matthieu Roy-Barman (UVSQ) – Examinateur / Laurent Bopp (LMD, ENS) – Directeur / Sophie Szopa (LSCE, CEA Saclay) – Co-directrice

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: February 18, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Émilie Klein (ENS)
Title: From ice shelf to subduction zone, hunting down transient signals using GPS

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: February 11, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Veronique Leonardi (HydroSciences Montpellier)
Title: Karstogenèse : Processus, Facteurs et Modélisation – Exemple d’un aquifère méditerranéen (Lez, France)
Astract: La complexité et l’hétérogénéité des aquifères karstiques rendent difficile une exploitation optimisée de leur ressource souterraine; les drains karstiques qui comprennent l’eau souterraine mobilisable en grande quantité, étant difficilement localisables. Aucun modèle et aucune méthodologie actuellement ne permet d’identifier précisément ces zones de drainage préférentielles, pouvant aider à l’implantation de forage d’exploitation de cette ressource en eau. Une meilleure connaissance de la mise en place au cours du temps de ces drains permettrait cependant d’identifier les zones propices à leur existence. De nombreuses études ont été ainsi réalisées afin de comprendre comment ces drains se développent permettant de supposer leurs zones d’expansion dans l’espace. Ces études reposent soit sur des approches qualitatives avec des mesures et observations de terrain (Blanc, 1995a; Mocochain et al., 2006; Combes et al., 2008; Durand et al., 2009; Leonardi et al., 2011; Jouves et al., 2017; Harmand et al., 2017), soit sur des approches quantitatives avec des modèles numériques théoriques de la karstogenèse basés sur des lois physico-chimiques (Palmer, 1991; Dreybrodt et al., 2005; Kaufmann, 2009, Dreybrodt and Gabrovšek, 2018; Alliouche et al., 2019). Cependant, du fait de la complexité de ces modèles physico-chimiques, très peu de modèles de karstogenèse n’ont pu être appliqué à des aquifères karstiques à l’échelle régionale, permettant de valider dans l’espace les hypothèses de karstification issues des observations de terrain.
Cette étude a pour objectif d’identifier et caractériser les principales phases de karstification qui ont affecté l’aquifère du Lez (Nord Montpellier, France), ceci à partir d’observations in situ, de données bibliographiques et d’analyses de données structurales et hydrodynamiques. A partir de celles-ci, une modélisation de ce réservoir karstique a été réalisé à partir d’un modèle génétique de type probabilistique (GOdiag, développé par G. Massonnat (Massonnat, 2012, 2014; Massonnat and Morandini, 2012) : ce modèle génétique a permis de tester différents scénarios et d’identifier les phases de karstification qui ont eu un impact majeur sur la morphologie karstique souterraine actuelle, et ainsi de caractériser les structures et processus qui sont à l’origine de cette morphologie.

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: February 6, 2020
Time: 14h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Angélique Benoit (ENS / CEA)
Title: Vers un suivi continu des faibles déplacements de surface par interférométrie radar : étude du comportement asismique le long de la faille Nord Anatolienne
Abstract: The North Anatolian fault, which cuts across the northern part of Turkey from west to east over more than 1000 km, is one of the largest active faults on earth. During the 20th century, almost the entire length of this fault ruptured during the westward propagation of more than a dozen major earthquakes (M7+). If this fault is known for its active seismicity, it exhibits on the other hand an aseismic behavior, especially in its central segment, where it slips continuously at a rate of about 2.5 cm/yr. However, the study of recent geodetic data and creepmeters suggests that aseismic slip is episodic rather than steady in time, where slip on the fault is thought to occur within days to month-long slip episodes (slow slip events), hence calling for a new assessment of the physics of fault slip along this segment.
Thanks to synthetic aperture radar interferometry, we analyze the spatial and temporal variations of interseismic deformation occurring along the central segment of the North Anatolian fault, a 300 km-long section covering the segments that rup- tured during the last M7.3 earthquake in 1944. To do so, we detect and characterize each slow slip event detected along this segment.
First, we develop tools to mitigate sources of noise in InSAR, such as those associated to atmospheric effects and to phase unwrapping. We generate 333 interferograms from SAR data of the ascending track covering the study area, acquired by the Sentinel-1 satellites during the period from 2014 to 2018. We compare the performances of three atmospheric models, HRES, ERA-Interim and ERA-5, and demonstrate that the best atmospheric corrections are performed with ERA-5 model, a reanalysis of meteorological data delivered by ECMWF. Then, we develop an innovative algorithm called CorPhU, which allows us to automatically correct unwrapping errors by considering the phase closure of triplets of interferograms. Thanks to our fast implementation, all these errors are corrected automatically within our entire interferometric network. In addition, we process three ascending tracks acquired by the ALOS satellite during the period from 2007 to 2011, covering the same area, and correct interferograms from ionospheric delays with a split-range spectrum method.
We then use a Small Baseline approach to perform a time series analysis of the interferograms corrected for each of the tracks. All mean line-of-sight (LOS) deformation velocity maps agree with a dextral movement across the fault and show both temporal and lateral variations of the velocity gradient in the fault zone. Aseismic slip mostly concentrates along a 100 km-long section, located near the city of Ismetpasa, and slip velocity decreases over time, from 2 cm/yr between 2007 and 2011, to less than 1 cm/yr from 2014 to 2018.
We then characterize fault slip modes along this section by visual inspection, searching for possible aseismic slip events in the time series. We identify, at least, three slow slip events from Sentinel-1 data. We then characterize these events in terms of lateral extension, duration and amount of displacement. We finally open the discussion on the study of slow slip events relate to the associated seismic hazard.
Jury: Juliet BIGGS (University of Bristol) / Rowena LOHMAN (Cornell University) / Rodolphe CATTIN (Université de Montpellier) / Gabriel DUCRET (IFPEN) / Christophe VIGNY (ENS) / Béatrice PINEL-PUYSSÉGUR (CEA) / Romain JOLIVET (ENS)

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: February 5, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Julien Boé (CERFACS)
Title: Uncertainties in future summer climate change in Europe: global climate models versus regional climate models
Abstract:
We assess the differences of future climate changes over Europe in summer as projected by state-of-the-art regional climate models (RCM, from the EURO-Coordinated Regional Downscaling Experiment) and by their forcing global climate models (GCM, from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5) and study the associated physical mechanisms. We show that important discrepancies at large-scales exist between global and regional projections. The RCMs project at the end of the 21st century over a large area of Europe a summer warming 1.5-2 K smaller, and a smaller decrease in precipitation.
The RCMs generally simulate a much smaller increase in shortwave radiation at surface, which directly impacts surface temperature. In addition to differences in cloud cover changes, the absence of time-varying anthropogenic aerosols in most regional simulations plays a major role in the differences of solar radiation changes. We confirm this result with twin regional simulations with and without time-varying anthropogenic aerosols. Additionally, the RCMs simulate larger increases in evapotranspiration over the Mediterranean sea and larger increases / smaller decreases over land, which contribute to smaller changes in relative humidity, with likely impacts on clouds and precipitation changes. Potential causes of these differences in evapotranspiration changes are discussed. Finally, new results from CMIP6 are put in perspective.

CERES

Date: February 4, 2020
Time: 14h
Location: Amphithéâtre Galois – Bâtiment Rataud, 45 rue d’Ulm
By: Jean-Baptiste Fressoz (EHESS) & Cédric Philibert (AIE)
Title: La transition énergétique est-elle vraiment possible ? Approches historiques, technologiques et économiques

Département de Géosciences

Date: February 4, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Corinne Le Quéré (Haut Conseil pour le Climat / University of East Anglia)
Title: Le budget global de carbone et son évolution dans les décennies à venir
Abstract:
Cette présentation se fera en trois parties. La première mettra l’emphase sur les connaissances scientifiques. Elle couvrira nos connaissances actuelles des émissions de CO2 globales et de leur répartition dans l’environnement. Elle portera sur les limites de notre capacité à expliquer dans les détails l’évolution du CO2 atmosphérique observée, ainsi que le rôle de l’océan et de la biosphère terrestre dans la modulation de ce signal. La deuxième partie portera un regard sur les dernières tendances en émissions de CO2. Elle montrera les progrès faits par les 18 pays où les émissions ont diminuées significativement lors de la décennie 2005-2015 (dont la France), et les facteurs principaux qui ont soutenu ces diminutions. Finalement la présentation fera un survol des recommandations émises par le Haut conseil pour le climat et des réponses nationales et internationales attendues pour stabiliser le climat conformément avec les objectifs de l’Accord de Paris, pour conclure avec quelques mots sur le rôle que la communauté scientifique peut jouer en appui à la transition vers la neutralité carbone.

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: January 30, 2020 – THURSDAY
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Gisela Charó (Lab. de Fluidodinámica, Fac. de Ingeniería, Univ. de Buenos Aires)
Title: The heritage of Poincaré and the algebraic topology of the Lorenz model’s random attractor
Abstract:
Poincaré first described the way in which a dynamical system’s properties depend upon its topology. In this work, we study the temporal evolution of the topological structure of the branched manifold associated with the Lorenz model’s random attractor (LORA), when driven by multiplicative noise. While the attractor associated with the classical, deterministic Lorenz (1963) model is “strange” but fixed in time, LORA is a pullback attractor that changes in time in a rather spectacular fashion.
LORA’s topological structure can be studied by using homology groups Hn. These groups are a key tool of algebraic topology that characterizes the number of n-dimensional holes of a branched manifold: the connected components (0- dimensional holes), the cycles (1-dimensional holes), the cavities (2- dimensional holes), and so on. Our work shows that LORA is a 2-dimensional branched manifold whose number of 1-dimensional holes changes over time, i.e., its homology group H1 is distinct from the fixed one of Lorenz’s “butterfly” and cycles are created or destroyed by the noise

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: January 28, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Suzanne Atkins (ENS)
Title: Attempts to access mantle history using geodynamics, plate reconstructions and machine learning
Abstract: 
The Earth’s crust and mantle move together. We can follow this movement through time using the geological record to create plate tectonic reconstructions. This history of the surface gives us a starting point from which to make inferences about the state of the mantle.  These inferences are often based on geodynamic modelling. However, going from simple inferences to more robust inversions is severely hampered by the uncertainties in plate reconstruction models, missing equations of state for the mantle and limited computational resources.  We can improve these inferences by considering the statistics of mantle convection and using tools such as neural networks.  The statistical consideration of the mantle can also be used to improve plate tectonic reconstructions, thereby improving the data available to study the history of the mantle.

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: January 22, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: David Flack (ENS)
Title: Can CMIP 6 models represent the dynamics of the Stalactite Cyclone (NAWDEX IOP 6)
Abstract: For confidence to be achieved in future projections of extra-tropical cyclones we need to be sure that climate models can represent them in the current climate. However, this representation should be considered through the dynamical and diabatic processes operating within cyclones rather than just the statistics. Using CMIP6 and higher resolution configurations of the IPSL and CNRM climate models run in “weather-forecast” mode in depth case studies of a rapidly-deepening cyclone sampled during the NAWDEX (North Atlantic Waveguide and Downstream impact EXperiment) field campaign is considered. Differences between the simulations and the analysis is associated with the representation of initial cyclogenesis. The quasi-geostrophic omega equation is then used to separate the contributions between dynamical and diabatic processes in the development of the cyclones. The results show that for both cyclones and all simulations the strongest deepening stage is first dominated by diabatic processes and then dynamical processes. Contrary to expectations, there is no obvious stronger contribution of diabatic processes with increased resolution, instead the dynamic processes increase with importance. The climate models are also compared against observations made during the NAWDEX campaign, and indicate that the models produce too much supercooled liquid. These cases show that further work into the representation of cyclones in climate models, focusing on baroclinic interaction and latent heating is required to improve confidence in the projections for the behaviour of extra-tropical cyclones in the future.

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: January 21, 2019
Time: 14h
Location: Salle des Actes – 45 rue d’Ulm – 1er étage escalier A
By: Samson Marty (ENS)
Title: Rayonnement haute-fréquence et précurseurs des séismes en laboratoire
Abstract: Au cours de cette thèse, nous avons reproduit expérimentalement des séismes à l’échelle centimétrique dans des conditions de pression proches de la réalité. Les expériences réalisées nous ont permis d’explorer deux grandes thématiques : (i) l’origine du rayonnement haute-fréquence pendant la rupture dynamique et (ii) les signaux précurseurs pendant la phase de nucléation de la rupture dynamique.
Nos résultats montrent que le rayonnement haute-fréquence est concomitant à la propagation du front de rupture et que deux paramètres induisent une augmentation du rayonnement haute-fréquence : l’état de contrainte initial et la vitesse de rupture. Les analyses microstructurales des échantillons de roches suggèrent que la production d’endommagement cosismique ou de particules de gouge contribue au rayonnement haute fréquence.
L’étude des signaux précurseurs (i.e., précurseurs acoustiques) montre que la nucléation est un processus en très large majorité asismique. Ce très faible couplage pourrait expliquer le peu d’observations de séismes précurseurs à l’échelle des failles crustales. L’analyse temporelle des émissions acoustiques suggère que leur dynamique est principalement contrôlée par l’accélération du glissement pendant la phase de nucléation. La microtopographie et la microstructure des échantillons de roches montrent que le couplage est directement relié à la rugosité du plan de faille. Une augmentation des conditions de pression favorise l’occurrence de processus de déformation plastique ou de fusion partielle au cours de la rupture sismique, ce qui diminue la rugosité et donc le couplage.
Jury: Elisa Tinti (SapienzaUniv.) : Rapportrice / Michel Bouchon (ISTerre) : Rapporteur / Aitaro Kato (ERI – Tokyo Univ.) : Examinateur / Clément Narteau (IPGP) : Examinateur / Alexandre SCHUBNEL (ENS) : Directeur / Harsha  S. Bhat (ENS) : CoDirecteur / Eiichi Fukuyama (Kyoto Univ.) : Invité

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: January 21, 2020
Time: 10h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Lavinia Tunini (ENS / OGS-CSR)
Title: Crustal deformation in stable continental regions – The case of central-western Europe

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: January 15, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Davide Faranda (LSCE)
Title: Perils of using Recurrent Neural Network to learn the Dynamics of Geophysical Flows
Abstract: Recent advances in statistical learning have opened the possibility to forecast the behavior of chaotic systems using recurrent neural network. In this letter we investigate the applicability of this framework to geophysical flows, known to be intermittent and turbulent. We show that both turbulence and intermittency introduce severe limitations on the applicability of recurrent neural network both for short term forecasts as well as for the reconstruction of the underlying attractor. We suggest that possible strategies to overcome such limitations should be based on separating the smooth large scale dynamics, from the intemittent/turbulent features.
Authors: D. Faranda, A. Hamid, G. Carella, C.G. Ngoungue Langue, F.M.E. Pons, M. Vrac, S. Thao, M. Rabarivola, V. Gautard, P. Yiou

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: January 14, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Frantisek Gallovic (Charles University)
Title: Earthquake Dynamic Rupture Modeling Constrained by Seismic Observations

CERES

Date: January 7, 2020
Time: 14h
Location: Amphithéâtre Galois – Bâtiment Rataud, 45 rue d’Ulm
By: Nathalie De Noblet (LSCE) & Josyane Ronchail (LOCEAN)
Title: Services climatiques : comment les climatologues cherchent à répondre aux demandes sociétales

Département de Géosciences

Date: January 7, 2020
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Cathy Quantin-Nataf (Université Lyon 1)
Title: Early Mars investigations in the perspectives of ExoMars and Mars2020 missions

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: December 19, 2019
Time: 14h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Cédric Bailly (ENS/IFPEN)
Title: Caractérisation géologique et géophysique multi-échelle des carbonates lacustres de l’île de Samos (Miocène supérieur, Grèce) - Liens entre faciès, diagenèse et propriétés élastiques
Abstract: Cette thèse propose une caractérisation géologique et géophysique multi-échelle des carbonates lacustres et palustres d’âge Miocène Supérieur affleurant à Samos (Grèce). Sur le terrain, un couplage entre descriptions naturalistes, mesures acoustiques à l’affleurement et réalisation de profils de sismique réfraction a permis de déterminer les caractéristiques sédimentologiques et les propriétés élastiques de ces carbonates, d’une échelle métrique à décamétrique. Au laboratoire, en parallèle des mesures de vitesse des ondes, porosité et densité sur échantillons, une description pétrographique fine des microstructures carbonatées a été réalisée afin de lier faciès, diagenèse et propriétés élastiques. De plus, sur la base des données de vitesse et de densité, des sismiques synthétiques 1D à haute résolution ont été générées et confrontées aux descriptions naturalistes. Les résultats obtenus montrent que la genèse de réflecteurs synthétiques est contrôlée par des contrastes faciologiques et/ou diagénétiques. Enfin, le changement d’échelle des propriétés élastiques des carbonates est abordé à l’aide de l’utilisation d’un modèle de milieux effectifs. Ce modèle a permis de relier les mesures de vitesse acquises aux fréquences ultrasoniques, soniques et sismiques à différentes échelles d’hétérogénéités. En effet, les résultats obtenus montrent que selon l’échelle d’investigation, les facteurs de contrôle dominants sur les propriétés élastiques des carbonates changent. Cette thèse propose ainsi une approche peu répandue, couplant observations naturalistes, mesures acoustiques et modélisation à différentes échelles. Elle permet d’apporter de nouvelles clés de compréhension et de caractérisation des carbonates continentaux, transposables à la subsurface.
Jury: Rudy SWENNEN (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven) : Rapporteur / François FOURNIER (CEREGE – Aix-Marseille Université) : Rapporteur / Emmanuelle VENNIN (Université de Bourgogne) : Examinateur / Yves GUÉGUEN (École normale supérieure) : Examinateur / Michel DIETRICH (CNRS, ISTerre) : Examinateur / Pierre-Yves COLIN (Université de Bourgogne) : Invité / Youri HAMON (IFP Énergies Nouvelles) : Co-Directeur / Jérôme FORTIN (École normale supérieure) : Directeur

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: December 18, 2019
Time: 14h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Bernard Legras (ENS)
Title: Campagne Stratoclim 2017 et le confinement de l’air pollué dans l’anticyclone de la mousson d’Asie

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: December 12, 2019 – THURSDAY
Time: 14h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Matteo Zampieri (JRC)
Title: How to measure resilience of productive systems: an ecological theory applied to climate science
Abstract: The original ecological meaning of the term resilience refers to the largest pressure that a system can cope with before changing its internal structure and losing its functioning capacity (Holling 1973). Afterwards, the concept of resilience has been introduced in other fields such as engineering and social sciences and modified to the point that resilience became an elusive concept, difficult to determine quantitatively. I’m proposing a measure theory for resilience derived directly from its original definition applied to production systems such as crops and natural vegetation. I will present several applications such as the estimations of the relationship between diversity and production resilience, of the effects of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation on the resilience of global maize production, of the effects of climate change on the resilience of wheat production in the Mediterranean, of the relationships between vegetation resilience and green water resources resilience and of the effects of climate change on green water resources resilience.

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: December 3, 2019
Time: 14h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Jérôme Aubry (ENS)
Title: Séismes au laboratoire : friction, plasticité et bilan énergétique
Abstract: Au sein de la lithosphère, la transition entre déformations fragile et plastique des roches s’effectue dans le régime semi-cassant. Comprendre le comportement des failles naturelles dans le régime semi-cassant est fondamental puisque d’importants séismes nucléent à la base de la zone sismogénique, à des conditions de pression et température proches de celles de la transition fragile-plastique. Pendant un séisme, l’énergie élastique accumulée lors de la période intersismique est dissipée au sein de l’interface de glissement par des processus frictionnels et de fracture, le reste étant relâché sous forme d’ondes sismiques. Ce budget énergétique est influencé par la déformation des surfaces de failles pendant des glissements lents à rapides, et plus particulièrement par des processus de chauffage, invisibles aux yeux de la sismologie. Afin d’étudier la déformation semi-cassante des roches et le budget énergétique des séismes, nous avons effectué des expériences de reproduction de séismes au laboratoire, en conditions triaxiales, à l’aide de failles expérimentales de différentes lithologies. Nous avons étudié l’influence de la pression, de la vitesse de déformation, de la température et de la rugosité sur la stabilité des failles le long de la transition fragile-plastique et exploré la dynamique des séismes au laboratoire en mesurant la quantité de chaleur produite sur une faille durant un cycle sismique. Deux conclusions principales émanent de ces travaux. D’abord, les séismes au laboratoire peuvent se déclencher au sein de roches déformées plastiquement dans le régime semi-cassant. Les glissements observés sont majoritairement contrôlés par la rugosité de la faille. Pour finir, lors d’un cycle sismique, les failles opèrent une transition depuis un stade avec de multiples aspérités radiant peu d’énergie, à un stade où elles évoluent comme une aspérité unique, radiant un maximum d’énergie.
Jury: Marie Violay (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Suisse) : Rapporteure / Stefan Nielsen (Durham University, Royaume-Uni) : Rapporteur / Wenlu Zhu (Maryland University, Etats-Unis) : Examinatrice / Jérôme Fortin (École Normale Supérieure Paris, France) : Examinateur / Javier Escartín (Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, France) : Co-directeur de thèse / Alexandre Schubnel (École Normale Supérieure Paris, France) : Directeur de thèse

Département de Géosciences

Date: December 3, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Éric Buffetaut (Géosciences-ENS)
Title: À la recherche de l’Autruche géante asiatique

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: December 3, 2019
Time: 9h30
Location: Salle W – 45 rue d’Ulm
By: Henda GUERMAZI (ENS / ENIS)
Title: Télédétection des aérosols sulfatés d’origine volcanique dans l’Infrarouge Thermique
Abstract: The main objective of this thesis is to develop new satellite observations of volcanic sulphate aerosols in the thermal infrared. We found, as first results, that it is important to consider the radiative interference between sulphate aerosols and SO2 in order to optimize satellite retrievals of the two species. For a simulated volcanic eruption, the mutual effect of SO2 and sulphate aerosols on the TIR outgoing radiation is evident after three to five days from the eruption. Significant overestimations may be introduced in SO2 retrievals if the presence of sulphate aerosols is not taken into account. The high spectral resolution of IASI instrument allows the observation of these two effluents as independent quantities with limited uncertainties. Based on these results, we developed a new retrieval algorithm using IASI observations, called AEROIASI-Sulphates, to measure vertically-resolved sulphates aerosols extinctions and mass concentration profiles. The algorithm is applied to a moderate eruption of Mount Etna volcano. AEROIASI-Sulphates correctly identifies the volcanic sulphate aerosols plume morphology both horizontally and vertically after comparisons with SO2 plume observations and simulations. For an initial sulphur mass of 1.5 kT, 60% of the injected sulphur mass is converted to particulate matter after 24 h from the beginning of the eruption. A shortwave and direct radiative forcing of -0.8 W/m2 is exerted at the regional scale in the western Mediterranean area. This is the first time that sulphate aerosols are quantitatively observed from space-based instruments in the nadir geometry, which is of great importance to monitor and quantify volcanic emissions, their evolution and impacts at the regional scale.
Jury: Hervé Herbin (LOA, U-Lille) : rapporteur / Abdelaziz Kallel (CRNS, Tunisie, Sfax) : rapporteur / Fabio D’Andrea (LMD, ENS) : examinateur / Cathy Clerbaux (LATMOS, Sorbonnes Université) : examinatrice / Juan Cuesta (LISA, U-PEC) : examinateur / Bernard Legras (LMD, ENS) : directeur de thèse / Farhat Rekhiss (ENIS, Tunisie, Sfax) : directeur de thèse / Pasquale Sellitto (LISA, U-PEC) : co-directeur de thèse

CERES

Date: November 26, 2019
Time: 14h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Anaïs Orsi (LSCE) & Anne Choquet (Université de Brest)
Title: Fonte de l’Arctique : comment le changement climatique rebat les cartes géopolitiques

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: November 26, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Bertrand Guenet (ENS)
Title: Priming effect: from laboratory experiments to global impact

Climaction

Date: November 20, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Laurent Bopp, Nicolas Rochetin, Bernard Legras (LMD-ENS)
Title: Quelques clés pour répondre aux arguments climatosceptiques
Abstract: Dans une optique d’autoformation, les chercheurs du LMD exposent les résultats récents de leurs communautés et donnent à tous des clés pour répondre à quelques arguments climatosceptiques : « L’augmentation du CO2 dans l’atmosphère n’est pas anthropique mais liée au dégazage de l’océan » ; « L’atmosphère est déjà saturée en CO2 » ; « Ce sont les variations de l’insolation solaire qui causent les variations de températures »…

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: November 19, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Michelle Almakari (Mines ParisTech)
Title: Fault Reactivation by Fluid Injection: Insights from Numerical Modeling

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: November 15, 2019 – FRIDAY
Time: 14h30
Location: Salle Serre
By: Chris Rollins (Leeds University)
Title: How geodesy can help characterize earthquake hazard

CERES

Date: November 12, 2019
Time: 14h
Location: Amphithéâtre Galois – Bâtiment Rataud, 45 rue d’Ulm
By: Aglaé Jézéquel (LMD-ENS) & Sandrine Revet (CERI Sciences-po)
Title: À qui attribue-t-on les catastrophes « naturelles » ? Perspectives croisées entre la climatologie et l’anthropologie

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: November 12, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Lucile Bruhat (ENS)
Title: Emergence of complexity from simple physics: how physics-based modeling highlights key features of earthquake processes

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: November 6, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Takahito Kataoka (JAMSTEC/YES)
Title: Wind-Mixed layer-SST Feedbacks in a tropical air-sea coupled system: Application to the Atlantic
Abstract: The ocean-atmosphere feedback associated with the thermodynamic coupling among wind speed, evaporation, and sea surface temperature (SST), called the wind-evaporation-SST (WES) feedback, contributes to the cross-equatorial SST gradient over the tropical oceans. By conducting an eigenanalyses of simple linear air-sea coupled models, it is shown that two additional feedback processes are present when the variable oceanic mixed layer depth (MLD) is considered. The horizontal structures of the leading modes are similar to the WES mode, which shows a meridional dipole in the SST anomalies straddling the equator with cross-equatorial wind anomalies that represent the weakening/strengthening of the trade winds over the warm/cool SST anomalies. The coupling of the variable MLD with winds and SST more than doubles the growth rate of the WES mode and enhances the equatorward propagation of the coupled disturbances.
The identified feedbacks operate as follows. The weaker winds associated with warm SST anomalies shoal the mixed layer through suppressed turbulent mixing, which causes the mixed layer to be more sensitive to the climatological shortwave radiation and amplifies the initial positive SST anomalies. Likewise, deepening of the mixed layer due to stronger winds acts to maintain the negative SST anomaly on the other side of the dipole. The MLD anomalies can also be generated by the buoyancy flux anomaly related to the wind-induced latent heat flux anomaly.
The anti-phase relationship between the SST and MLD anomalies seen in the simple model bears some resemblance to that which is observed in the observations and a state-of-the-art coupled model (MIROC6) during the Atlantic meridional mode.
Also, results from an ongoing work on yet another coupled feedback involving freshwater flux, which utilize a theoretical model and sensitivity experiments of fully coupled model, will be mentioned if time allows.

Département de Géosciences

Date: November 5, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Thierry Huyghes-Beaufond (Société du Grand Paris)
Title: Le Grand Paris Express – Un projet pour le XXIème siècle

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: October 31, 2019
Time: 14h00
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Thomas Chartier (ENS)
Title: Modélisation de l’activité sismique des failles pour le calcul probabiliste du risque sismique
Abstract: Les taux de sismicité sont un élément clé du calcul probabiliste de l’aléa et du risque sismique. Une méthodologie innovante est développée pour modéliser les taux de ruptures complexes dans un système de failles (SHERIFS). La flexibilité de la méthodologie permet de la partager et de l’appliquer sur des systèmes de failles différents et de s’en servir comme outil de discussion des hypothèses concernant la sismicité sur les failles. Les taux de sismicité dans la partie Ouest du Rift de Corinthe en Grèce et dans la région de Marmara en Turquie sont modélisés en explorant l’incertitude épistémique sur le scenario de rupture maximale, la distribution en magnitude et fréquence ou encore les conditions de glissement sur la faille. A Marmara, les hypothèses sont pondérées dans un arbre logique en comparant les taux modélisés aux taux calculés à partir des données et des résultats d’un modèle physique basé sur les équations “rate and state”. Pour chaque hypothèse de l’arbre logique, le risque sismique à Istanbul, en termes de probabilité d’effondrement d’un immeuble, est calculé pour deux bâtiments de même type construits respectivement suivant le code de construction de 1975 et celui de 1998. Le risque sismique est six fois plus important pour le bâtiment le plus ancien. Parmi les incertitudes explorées, la source d’incertitude plus importante est liée à la distribution en magnitude et fréquence. L’utilisation des données et du modèle physique permet de réduire l’incertitude sur le risque par un facteur 1.6. Une nouvelle méthodologie de désagrégation du risque permet de montrer que le risque à Istanbul est contrôlé en partie par les séismes de magnitude supérieure à 7 sur la Faille Nord Anatolienne et en partie par les séismes de magnitude modérée (4.5 à 6) dans la sismicité de fond, sur des failles non connues, et à une distance du bâtiment inférieure à 10 km.
Jury: Kuo-Fong Ma (National Central University) : Rapporteur / Stéphane Mazzotti (Université Montpellier 2) : Rapporteur / Alice-Agnes Gabriel (Munich University) : Examinateur / Nicolas Chamot-Rooke (École Normale Supérieure) : Examinateur / Hélène Lyon-Caen (École Normale Supérieure) : Directrice de thèse / Oona Scotti (Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire) : Co-Encadrante de thèse / Aurélien Boiselet (Axa) : Invité

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: October 29, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Milena Marjanovic (IPGP)
Title: Imaging of crustal structure using waveform inversion techniques at the East Pacific Rise (EPR) 9º50’N: implications for crustal accretion and hydrothermal circulation
Abstract: The East Pacific Rise (EPR) 9ºN is one of the magmatically most dynamic ocean spreading centers along which ~6 km thick oceanic crust has been forming. In addition, the EPR 9ºN is a portion of the mid-ocean ridge system characterized by prolific hydrothermal activity. To image and characterize the properties of the crust and processes involved, we collected high-quality multichannel seismic data (2-D and 3-D) to which I applied advanced waveform-inversion techniques. During the talk, I will first present results of 2-D full-waveform inversion (FWI) on an axis centered seismic line to investigate hydrothermal circulation and propose a fine-scale permeability model for the upper crust. In the second part of the talk, I will focus on the results of elastic 3-D full-waveform inversion to address the physical properties of the upper crustal structure in 3-D and propose a possible mechanism for the upper crust accretion.

Soutenance – Thèse

Date: October 23, 2019
Time: 14h30
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Nikolaos Roukounakis (ENS / University of Patras)
Title: Application of a high-resolution weather model in the area of the western Gulf of Corinth for the tropospheric correction of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) observations
Abstract: Space geodesy techniques (SAR interferometry and GNSS) have recently emerged as an important tool for mapping regional surface deformations due to tectonic movements. A limiting factor to this technique is the effect of the troposphere, as horizontal and vertical surface velocities are of the order of a few mm yr-1, and high accuracy (to mm level) is essential. The troposphere introduces a path delay in the microwave signal, which, in the case of GNSS Precise Point Positioning (PPP), can nowadays be successfully removed with the use of specialized mapping functions. Moreover, tropospheric stratification and short wavelength spatial turbulences produce an additive noise to the low amplitude ground deformations calculated by the (multitemporal) InSAR methodology. InSAR atmospheric phase delay corrections are much more challenging, as opposed to GNSS PPP, due to the single pass geometry and the gridded nature of the acquired data. Several methods have been proposed, including Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) zenithal delay estimations, satellite multispectral imagery analysis, and empirical phase/topography estimations. These methods have their limitations, as they rely either on local data assimilation, which is rarely available, or on empirical estimations which are difficult in situations where deformation and topography are correlated. Thus, the precise knowledge of the tropospheric parameters along the propagation medium is extremely useful for the estimation and minimization of atmospheric phase delay, so that the remaining signal represents the deformation mostly due to tectonic or other geophysical processes.
In this context, the current PhD Thesis aims to investigate the extent to which a high-resolution weather model, such as WRF, can produce detailed tropospheric delay maps of the required accuracy, by coupling its output (in terms of Zenith Total Delay or ZTD) with the vertical delay component in GNSS measurements. The model initially is operated with varying parameterization in order to demonstrate the best possible configuration for our study, with GNSS measurements providing a benchmark of real atmospheric conditions. In the next phase, the two datasets (predicted and observed) are compared and statistically evaluated for a period of one year, in order to investigate the extent to which meteorological parameters that affect ZTD, can be simulated accurately by the model under different weather conditions. Finally, a novel methodology is tested, in which ZTD maps produced from WRF and validated with GNSS measurements in the first phase of the experiment are used as a correction method to eliminate the tropospheric effect from selected InSAR interferograms. Results show that a high-resolution weather model which is fine-tuned at the local scale can provide a valuable tool for the tropospheric correction of InSAR remote sensing data.
Jury: Konstantinos KATSAMPALOS (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki): Reporter / Laurent MOREL (CNAM, Le Mans, France): Reporter / Cécile DOUBRE (Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre, Strasbourg, France): Examiner / François LOTT (CNRS, Paris, France): Examiner / Stéphane JACQUEMOUD (Université Denis Diderot – Paris VII): Examiner / Athanassios ARGIRIOU (University of Patras, Greece): Co-director of thesis / Pierre BRIOLE (CNRS, ENS, Paris, France): Co-director of thesis

CERES

Date: October 22, 2019
Time: 14h
Location: Jussieu – salle Pacifique 56/66, 3ème étage
By: Valentin Bellassen (INRA) & Aude Valade (Centre de Recerca Ecologica Catalogne)
Title: Le CO2 qui cache la forêt : la biomasse forestière est-elle une énergie renouvelable ?

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: October 22, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Manon Bickert (IPGP)
Title: Strain localization in oceanic detachment faults: the extreme case of a magma-starved slow spreading ridge

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: October 16, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Benjamin Fildier (ENS)
Title: Modeling uncertainties on the acceleration of the global hydrologic cycle

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: October 15, 2019
Time: All day
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Laboratoire de Géologie de l’ENS, l’ISTeP et la SFMC
Title: Journée scientifique Metamorphism, equilibrium versus kinetics autour de Dave Pattison

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: October 9, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Simon Cabanes (Sapienza Università di Roma)
Title: Describe and estimate energy transfers in the turbulent atmosphere of the gas giants

CERES

Date: October 8, 2019
Time: 14h
Location: Amphithéâtre Galois – Bâtiment Rataud, 45 rue d’Ulm
By: Vivian Depoues (I4CE), Catherine Lelong (RTE) & Pierre Goutierre (RTE)
Title: Infrastructures et réseaux face au changement climatique : adaptation spontanée ou planifiée ?

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: October 8, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Guilhem Mollon (INSA / ENS)
Title: Approches discrètes pour la modélisation du frottement

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: October 7, 2019 – MONDAY
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Antonio Avallone (INGV)
Title: Near-source high-rate GPS, strong motion and InSAR observations to image the 2015 Lefkada (Greece) Earthquake rupture history

Département de Géosciences

Date: October 1, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Chris Bowler (IBENS-ENS)
Title: Tara Oceans: Eco-Systems Biology at Planetary Scale
Abstract: The ocean is the largest ecosystem on Earth and yet we know very little about it. This is particularly true for the plankton that drift within, even though they form the base of marine food webs and are key players in Earth’s biogeochemical cycles. Ocean plankton are at least as important for the Earth system as the forests on land, but most of them are invisible to the naked eye and thus are largely uncharacterized. To increase our understanding of this underexplored world, a multidisciplinary consortium, Tara Oceans, was formed around the 36m research schooner Tara, which sampled plankton at more than 210 sites and multiple depth layers in all the major oceanic regions during expeditions from 2009-2013 (Karsenti et al. Plos Biol., 2011). This talk will summarize the first foundational resources from the project, which collectively represent the largest DNA sequencing effort for the oceans (see Science special issue May 22, 2015 and Nature 28 April, 2016), and their initial analyses, illustrating several aspects of the Tara Oceans’ eco-systems biology approach to address microbial contributions to macro-ecological processes. The project provides unique resources for several scientific disciplines that are foundational for mapping ocean biodiversity of a wide range of organisms that are rarely studied together, exploring their interactions, and integrating biology into our physico-chemical understanding of the ocean. These resources, and the scientific innovations emerging to understand them, are critical towards developing baseline ecological context and predictive power needed to track the impact of climate change on the oceans.

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: September 24, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Yo Fukushima (Tohoku University)
Title: Extremely early recurrence of intraplate fault rupture following the Tohoku-Oki earthquake

Soutenance – HDR

Date: September 18, 2019
Time: 14h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Caroline Muller (LMD-ENS)
Title: Fundamental study of small-scale processes in the atmosphere and in the ocean
Jury: Chantal Staquet, Bjorn Stevens, Frank Roux, Helene Chepfer, Christopher Holloway and Philippe Drobinski

CERES

Date: September 17, 2019
Time: 14h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Dipesh Chakrabarty (The University of Chicago)
Title: The Planet: An Emergent Humanist Category
Discutant: Pierre Charbonnier (EHESS)
Abstract: Earth system science (ESS), the science that among other things explains planetary warming and cooling, gives humans a very long, multilayered, and heterotemporal past by placing them currently at the conjuncture of three (and now variously interdependent) histories whose events are defined by very different timescales: the history of the planet, the history of life on the planet, and the history of the globe made by the logics of empires, capital, and technology. One can therefore read Earth system scientists as historians writing within an emergent regime of historicity. We could call it the planetary or Anthropocenic regime of historicity to distinguish it from the global regime of historicity that has enabled many humanist and social-science historians to deal with the theme of climate change and the idea of the Anthropocene. In the latter regime, however, historians try to relate the Anthropocene to histories of modern empires and colonies, the expansion of Europe and the development of navigation and other communication technologies, modernity and capitalist globalization, and the global and connected histories of science and technology.

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: September 17, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Jun Muto (Tohoku University)
Title: Persistent deep afterslip driven by nonlinear transient mantle flow and recovery of coastal subsidence after the 2011 Tohoku earthquake
Abstract: Globally, the largest earthquakes occur on subduction zones, and their associated tsunamis are one of the greatest potential hazards faced by nearby coastal communities. Such great (Mw>8) and giant (Mw>9) earthquakes cause subsequent post-seismic deformation in the wide area depending on viscous structures of crustal and mantle rocks and the frictional properties of the plate interface. In particular, progress of afterslip occurring at the down-dip of the main rupture region where coseismic stress changes are large significantly affects the post-seismic uplift of the cosesimically subsided coastal regions. However, for giant megathrust events, viscoelastic flow and deep afterslip are mechanically coupled to each other, relaxing stress changes induced by both coseismic and post-seismic slip. Here, we show the role of afterslip and viscoelastic relaxation, and their interplay in the aftermath of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake. We conduct a two-dimensional analysis of the post-seismic deformation with coeval slip on the subduction interface governed by rate-strengthening friction and distributed deformation away from the fault governed by a power-law rheology with transient creep. The power-law rheology with stress-driven afterslip well explains the observed post-seismic deformation field and its time series in the period 2011 to 2016. Moreover, the geodetic data indicate a persistent deep afterslip directly down-dip of the main rupture region that greatly affects the ongoing post-seismic coastal uplift. Mechanical coupling between viscoelastic relaxation and afterslip notably modifies both the afterslip distribution and the surface deformation. Thus, we find that it is important to consider the interplay of these two deformation mechanisms to more fully understand the geodynamics of the Japan trench during the early stage of the seismic cycle. Finally, we also point out that such mechanical coupling are critical to estimate the future recovery of the coseismically subsided coastal area.

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: September 10, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Samuel Angiboust (IPGP)
Title: Knockin’on Mantle’s Door – Field and Modeling Insights onto Tectonic Processes at the Base of the Seismogenic Zone

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: July 30, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Ma Kuo-Fong (NCU Taiwan / E-DREaM Center, NCU Taiwan / IES, Academia Sinica)
Title: Kinematics and dynamic modeling of current and past earthquakes: implication to multiple fault segments rupture and seismic hazard analysis in Taiwan

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: July 12, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Salle Serre
By: Valère Lambert (Caltech)
Title: Energy budget of earthquakes: Connecting remote observations with local physical behavior

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: July 9, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Jean-Paul Callot (Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour)
Title: Les pathologies salifères ou « ne zappez pas, tout est possible », exemples de Turquie et de la nappe de Digne

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: July 3-4, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Lead by Blandine Gardonio (Géologie ENS) & David Marsan (ISTerre)
Title: Workshop « Repeating Earthquakes Workshop In Paris »

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: June 25, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Sylvie Demouchy (Montpellier)
Title: Olivine & Hydrogen & Rheology of Earth upper mantle

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: June 20, 2019
Time: 14h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Kevin DellaSanta (NYU)
Title: Zonally Symmetric Variability in the Tropics: A Tropical Annular Mode?

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: June 20, 2019
Time: 10h30
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Denis ANGERS (Agriculture Canada et Université Laval)
Title: Sols, carbone et agriculture : perspective canadienne, mais pas que !

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: June 18, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Pierre Romanet (Univ. of Tokyo)
Title: Towards a better understanding of fault interactions and fault geometry on the seismic cycle

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: June 14, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Giovanni Occhipinti (IPGP)
Title: From Sumatra 2004 to Chile 2015 (through the revolutionary observations of Tohoku-Oki 2011): what we learn about Earthquake & Tsunami detection by ionospheric sounding

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: June 12, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Miriam Derrico (LSCE)
Title: Increase of Southern European cold spell intensity under climate change?

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: June 11, 2019
Time: 9h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Lead by Marie Farge (LMD-ENS)
Title: « International Workshop on Wavelets & CFD »

Département de Géosciences

Date: June 7, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Samuel Abiven (U. Zurich)
Title: Une approche holistique du cycle du carbone dans les écosystèmes terrestres

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: June 4, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Sascha Brune (GFZ)
Title: Continental rift dynamics: Numerical simulation and plate tectonic model analysis

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: May 29, 2019
Time: 14h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Ralf Giering (FastOpt)
Title: Automatic Differentiation and its applications in carbon cycle data assimilation, inversion, and uncertainty estimation

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: May 28, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Laetitia Le Pourhiet (ISTEP)
Title: Propagation de la rupture continentale en 3D: revisiter de vieux concepts avec de nouveaux outils

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: May 27, 2019
Time: 15h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Keigo Matsuda (JAMSTEC)
Title: Turbulent clustering influence of polydisperse droplets on radar cloud observation

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: May 24, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Louis Couston (British Antarctic Survey)
Title: Emergence of large-scale flows in turbulent, stratified geophysical fluids with and without rotation

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: May 23, 2019
Time: 14h
Location: Salle Serre
By: Timm John (Freie Universitat Berlin)
Title: The variation of petrophysical properties during eclogitization of lower continental crust and their influence on geophysical imaging

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: May 23, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Sonia Tikoo (Rutgers)
Title: Lunar Magnetism

Département de Géosciences

Date: May 22, 2019
Time: 16h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Ping Chang (Texas A&M University)
Title: A Case Study of Connection between Hurricanes and Ocean Heat Content – Hurricane Harvey

Département de Géosciences

Date: May 21, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: S. Le Garrec (CEA), L. Bopp (ENS), E. Pili (CEA)
Title: Réunion plénière du Laboratoire de Recherche Conventionné Yves Rocard – Présentation du Département Analyse, Surveillance, Environnement, du Département de Géosciences et du LRC Yves Rocard

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: May 20, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Eric Mortenson (University of Victoria, Canada / CSIRO, Australia)
Title: A biogeochemical model study of the recent decline in Arctic sea ice, and implications for air-sea exchange of carbon

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: May 17, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Ping Chang (Texas A&M University)
Title: Oceanic Fronts/Eddies, Atmospheric Rivers and Extreme Rainfall

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: May 15, 2019
Time: 14h
Location: Salle Serre
By: Emily Brodsky (UC Santa Cruz)
Title: Experiments on Naturalistic Granular Flows

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: May 14, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Masako Tominaga (WHOI)
Title: Multiscale Magnetometry Frontiers: Establishing a magnetic monitoring scheme of in situ metasomatism in mantle peridotite

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: May 9, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Alessandra Giannini (LMD-ENS)
Title: Past, present and future of climate change in the Sahel

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: May 7, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: James Hollingsworth (ISTerre)
Title: Illuminating active fault zones through correlation of optical satellite imagery

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: April 30, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Matthieu Galvez (ETH)
Title: Interactions eau-roche dans le cycle du carbone : du processus microscopique à la dynamique globale

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: April 23, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Anne Davaille (FAST/Paris Sud)
Title:  Morphology and dynamics of mid-ocean ridges: from laboratory experiments to the Earth and Venus

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: April 16, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Cécile Prigent (Univ. of Delaware)
Title:  Hydratation, déformation et sismicité du manteau le long des failles transformantes océaniques

Département de Géosciences

Date: April 9, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Florence Habets (Géologie ENS)
Title: La modélisation hydrogéologique pour le suivi et la prévision des ressources en eau souterraine

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: April 5, 2019
Time: 14h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Pearse BUCHANAN (University of Liverpool)
Title: Dynamic biological functioning important for simulating and stabilizing ocean biogeochemistry

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: April 5, 2019
Time: 10h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Adriano GUALANDI (JPL)
Title: Geodetic imaging of tectonic deformation: implications for earthquakes predictability

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: April 2, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Pascal Lacroix (ISTerre)
Title: Earthquake-triggered-landslides:  the contribution of slow-moving landslide studies

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: March 27, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Javier Escartin (IPGP)
Title: Submarine observations of coseismic rupture

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: March 26, 2019
Time: 10h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Lead by A. Jezequel (LMD-ENS)
Title: Workshop « Compounds events » : Extreme Value Theory for Open Set Classification – GPD and GEV Classifiers by Edoardo Vignotto (Université de Genève) & Assessing the impact caused by compound events, with a focus on the future changes in the compound flooding hazard by Emanuele Bevacqua (Université de Reading)

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: March 22, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Jean-Philippe Avouac (Caltech)
Title: Forecasting Earthquakes

Département de Géosciences

Date: March 21, 2019
Time: 14h
Location: Conf 4
By: Alexander Van Geen (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory)
Title: Considering geochemistry, hydrology, and human behavior to address the well-water arsenic problem in Bangladesh

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: March 19, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Pierre Maffre (GET)
Title: Climate and carbon cycle at geological timescale: mountain building, erosion and weathering

Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique

Date: March 12, 2019
Time: 14h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: A. Jezequel (LMD)
Title: Extreme event attribution: how and why?
Abstract:

Extreme events are an expression of natural climate variability. Since anthropogenic emissions affect global climate, it is natural to wonder whether recent observed extreme events are a manifestation of anthropogenic climate change. This seminar will be in two parts. First, I will present the existing scientific tools to study the influence of anthropogenic climate change on observed extreme events. I will focus on methods disentangling the influence of climate change on the dynamics leading to European heatwaves. Second, I will assess whether and how this scientific information — and more generally, the science of extreme event attribution (EEA) — could be useful for society.

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: March 12, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Rémy Bossu (CEA / Euro-Med Seismological Centre)
Title: How can Seismology Benefit from Citizen Seismology?

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: March 5, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Thomas Ferrand (ERI)
Title: Experimental confirmation of a spineloid transitional olivine polymorph using ultrafine-grained aggregates of Mg2GeO4

Laboratoire de Géologie

Date: February 26, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Rémy Bonnet (CERFACS)
Title: Variations du cycle hydrologique continental en France des années 1850 à aujourd’hui

Département de Géosciences

Date: February 19, 2019
Time: 11h
Location: Froidevaux – E314
By: Philippe Huneman (IHPST)
Title: Pourquoi est-il déraisonnable de croire aux théories du complot et pourquoi et pourquoi est-il déraisonnable d’abuser du mot complotisme

Date: September 25, 2018
Time: 13h
Location: E314
By: O. Pauluis (NYU)
Title: Atmospheric thermodynamics : The atmosphere as a heat engine
Abstract:

TBA

Date: October 1, 2018
Time: 14h30
Location: E314
By: O. Pauluis (NYU)
Title: Isentropic analysis for tropical cyclones
Abstract:

TBA

Date: October 10, 2018
Time: 11h
Location: E314
By: Hiro Masunaga (Nagoya University, Japan)
Title: A Mechanism for the Maintenance of Sharp Tropical Margins
Abstract:

The deep tropics characterized by moist air and deep convection are separated from the dry, quiescent subtropics often by a sharp horizontal gradient of moisture only loosely tied to SST or other geographical constraints. Mapes et al. (GRL, 2018) showed that this margin of the moist tropics is a true PDF minimum (a regime separatrix), along a column water vapor (CWV) contour around 48 mm in instantaneous data. Quasi-meridional statistical composites of observations across the poleward-most excursion of this sinuous contour retain the sharpness of the margin while increasing signal to noise ratio. Observations primarily from a suite of the A-Train satellites show the meridional structure of thermodynamic state and budget terms across the margin of the moist tropics. Composites are computed around the PDF-minimum CWV value of 48 mm as well as a range of other thresholds from 35 mm to 60 mm for comparison.

Major findings are summarized as follows. (1) CWV increases equatorward from the subtropics for all CWV thresholds but eventually converges to ~48 mm deep into the tropical side. Precipitation abruptly intensifies on the tropical side of the margin but declines equatorward to ~3 mm/d regardless of the CWV thresholds. (2) The diabatic forcing to the atmosphere (radiative heating plus surface heat flux) changes its sign across the CWV=48 mm border, being positive on the tropical side and negative on the subtropics. This contrast is owing to the meridional gradient of radiative heating, principally the longwave effect of high clouds. (3) Vertical mode decomposition applied to vertical moisture advection implies that the second -mode moistening is sharply enhanced on the subtropical side of the margin, suggesting that an efficient “congestus moistening” process may be at work as inflowing lower-tropospheric air masses approach the margin. This second-mode moistening changes abruptly to weaker first-mode advective moistening (with a modest fraction of the drying due to the abrupt jump of precipitation) once the air mass enters the tropics. These observed features are interpreted in terms of a simple theory from the moisture and heat budget perspectives.

Date: October 18, 2018
Time: 14h
Location: L369
By: Colin Grudzien, NERSC, Bergen, Norway
Title: A dynamical systems framework for ensemble based filtering: a problem partially solved
Abstract:

Séminaire SAMA (Groupe Statistiques pour l’Analyse, la Modélisation et l’Assimilation).
In physical applications, dynamical models and observational data play dual roles in prediction and uncertainty quantification, each representing sources of incomplete and inaccurate information. In data rich problems, first-principle physical laws constrain the degrees of freedom of massive data sets, utilizing our prior insights to complex processes. Respectively, in data sparse problems, dynamical models fill spatial and temporal gaps in observational networks. The dynamical chaos characteristic of these process models is, however, among the primary sources of forecast uncertainty in complex physical systems. Observations are thus required to update predictions where there is sensitivity to initial conditions and uncertainty in model parameters. Broadly referred to as data assimilation, or stochastic filtering, the techniques used to combine these disparate sources of information include methods from Bayesian inference, dynamical systems and optimal control. While the butterfly effect renders the forecasting problem inherently volatile, chaotic dynamics also put strong constraints on the evolution of errors. It is well understood in the weather prediction community that the growth of forecast uncertainty is confined to a much lower dimensional subspace corresponding to the directions of rapidly growing perturbations. The Assimilation in the Unstable Subspace (AUS) methodology of Trevisan et al. has offered understanding of the mechanisms governing the evolution of uncertainty in ensemble forecasting, exploiting this dimensional reduction prescribed by the dynamics. With my collaborators, I am studying the mathematical foundations of ensemble based filtering in the perspective of smooth and random dynamical systems.

Date: November 15, 2018
Time: 15h
Location: L378
By: Jun-Ichi Yano (Meteo France, Toulouse)
Title: Tropical Atmospheric Madden-Julian Oscillation: Strongly-Nonlinear Free Solitary Rossby Wave?
Abstract:

The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO), a planetary-scale eastward propagating coherent structure with periods of 30–60 days, is a prominent manifestation of intraseasonal variability in the tropical atmosphere. It is widely presumed that small-scale moist cumulus convection is a critical part of its dynamics. However, the recent results from high-resolution modeling as well as data analysis suggest that the MJO may be understood by dry dynamics to a leading-order approximation. Simple, further theoretical considerations presented herein suggest that if it is to be understood by dry dynamics, the MJO is most likely a strongly nonlinear solitary Rossby wave. Under a global quasi-geostrophic equivalent-barotropic formulation, modon theory provides such analytic solutions. Stability and the longevity of the modon solutions are investigated with a global shallow water model. The preferred modon solutions with the greatest longevities compare overall well with the observed MJO in scale and phase velocity within the factors.

Date: December 5, 2018
Time: 14h
Location: E314
By: Guillermo Scheffler, Centro de Investigaciones del Mar y la Atmosfera, Buenos Aires
Title: Optimization of stochastic parameters using nested ensemble Kalman filters
Abstract:

Séminaire SAMA (Groupe Statistiques pour l’Analyse, la Modélisation et l’Assimilation).
Stochastic parameterizations have been successfully used to represent the uncertainty associated with unresolved scale processes for ensemble forecasting and data assimilation systems. In order to accurately describe the uncertainty associated to the dynamical model and data assimilation system, stochastic parameters have to be optimized. Such parameters are related to the stochastic perturbations amplitude and their spatial covariance structure. A novel technique based on hierarchical ensemble Kalman filters is introduced, aiming to infer these type of parameters. The technique is proposed to be applied offline as part of an a priori optimization of the data assimilation system and could in principle be extended to the estimation of other hyperparameters of a data assimilation system.

Date: December 12, 2018
Time: 11h
Location: Salle serre
By: G. Bellon (University of Auckland)
Title: Oscillation de Madden-Julian dans les modèles de climat :encore et toujours problématique
Abstract:
Abstract: La plupart des modèles de climat ont toujours des difficultés à simuler des évènements réalistes de l’Oscillation de Madden-Julian(OMJ). Deux hypothèses ont été avancées pour expliquer cette déficience généralisée des modèles. La première avance que les modèles ne simule pas correctement le profil dechauffage diabatique dû au dégagement de chaleur latente, à l’effet radiatif et au mélange vertical dans les nuages ou ensembles de nuages, et que cette erreur des modèles influe sur la réponse dynamique de l’atmosphère tropicale qui permet le développement et la propagation de la perturbation convective de l’OMJ. La seconde hypothèse considère que les modèles quasi-hydrostatique sont incapables desimuler l’organisation spatiale de la convection profonde nécessaire à l’initiation d’un évènement del’OMJ. Cette incapacité serait due à l’absence de représentation des processus sous-maille et inter-maille qui sont essentiels cette organisation. Ce séminaire présentera quelques travaux qui s’attachent à évaluer le mérite de ces deux hypothèses: une évaluation des profils de chauffage diabatique simulés par les modèles et une exploration théorique de ce qu’on peut attendre de l’organisation spatiale de la convection.

Date: December 14, 2018
Time: 14h
Location: Salle serre
By: R. Brecht (Memorial University of Newfoundland)
Title: A variational discretization of the rotating shallow water equations on the sphere
Abstract:

We develop a variational integrator for the shallow-water equations on a rotating sphere. The variational integrator is built around a discretization of the continuous Euler–Poincaré reduction framework for Eulerian hydrodynamics. We describe the discretization of the continuous Euler–Poincaré equations on arbitrary simplicial meshes. Standard numerical tests are carried out to verify the accuracy and the excellent conservational properties of the discrete variational integrator.

Date: December 18, 2018
Time: 14h
Location: E314
By: Tom Beucler (MIT)
Title: Interaction between water vapor, radiation and convection in the Tropics
Abstract:

The interaction between convection and large-scale dynamics is a primary source of uncertainty in numerical simulations of the atmosphere, impeding our understanding of the climate. In large-scale atmospheric models, this uncertainty can be attributed to improperly-simulated interactions between atmospheric heating and water vapor across scales. Water vapor has a central role in the atmosphere: it is the most abundant greenhouse gas in the atmosphere, the main absorber of solar radiation in the troposphere. Water vapor is also intimately connected to atmospheric convection which lifts it, leading it to condense into clouds. Once formed, these clouds have even larger radiative effects. *However, we still lack a robust conceptual framework connecting water vapor and clouds to convection and radiation.

Using fluid dynamics, thermodynamics and spectral analysis tools, we investigate the interaction between water vapor, radiation and convection in observations of the tropical atmosphere and in high-resolution models of radiative-convective equilibrium. Radiative-convective equilibrium is the simplest model of the tropical atmosphere, in which convective heating balances radiative cooling in the absence of horizontal energy transport. We introduce a framework relating the evolution of the length scale at which convection organizes to the spatial spectra of radiative cooling, surface enthalpy fluxes, and horizontal energy transport. The cloud longwave radiative effect is most important, stretching humid and dry regions to scales of several thousand kilometers in the Tropics. These findings suggest that resolving the coherence between high, ice-cloud radiation and water vapor across the 1-10,000 km scale range is key to modeling tropical dynamics, and may considerably reduce our biases in modeling large-scale tropical precipitation patterns that are relevant for human activity.

Date: January 10, 2018
Time: TBA
Location: TBA
By: J. McWilliams (UCLA)
Title: TBA
Abstract:

TBA

Date: January 22, 2018
Time: 2pm
Location: E314
By: F. Ragone (Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca)
Title: Studying extreme climatic events with rare event algorithms applied to numerical climate models
Abstract:

A reliable quantification of the risk associated with extreme climatic events is crucial for policymakers, civil protection agencies and insurance companies. Studying extremes on a robust statistical basis with complex numerical climate models is however computationally challenging, since extreme events are rare, and thus very long simulations are needed to sample a significant number of them. I will discuss how the problem of sampling extremes in climate models can be tackled using rare event algorithms. Rare event algorithms are numerical tools developed in the past decades in mathematics and statistical physics, dedicated to the reduction of the computational effort required to sample rare events in dynamical systems. Typically they are designed as genetic algorithms, in which a set of cloning rules are applied to an ensemble simulation in order to focus the computational effort on the trajectories leading to the events of interest. I will present a rare event algorithm developed in the context of large deviation theory, and I will show how it can be used to sample very efficiently extreme European heat waves in simulations with the climate model Plasim. This allows to characterise the statistics of heat waves with return times up to millions of years, with computational costs three orders of magnitude smaller than with direct sampling. This allows to sample a large number of trajectories leading to very rare events, which can be used to study their characteristic dynamics, and also to observe ultra rare events that would have never been observed in a normal simulation. I will then discuss how these techniques can be applied to study a wide range of different processes with complex climate models.

Date: January 29 2019)
Time: 2pm
Location: E314
By: Hye-Yeong Chun (Yonsei University, South Korea)
Title: Small-Scale Convective Gravity Waves: Contribution to the Large-Scale Circulations in the Middle Atmosphere
Abstract:

Vertically propagating gravity waves (GWs) transfer their momentum and energy to the large-scale flow in the middle atmosphere, where they are dissipated through the wave breaking, critical-level filtering, and radiative damping processes. The current resolution of general circulation models (GCMs), even for high-resolution ones with horizontal grid spacing of ~0.25o, do not fully resolve GWs, and thus their effects have to be parameterized in GCMs. Among the various sources of GWs, convection can generate high-frequency GWs, which have a broad phase speed spectrum and can propagate to high altitudes without seasonal restrictions. In this seminar, observational characteristics of convective GWs (CGWs), parameterization of CGWs for use in GCMs, and impacts of CGWs in the large-scale circulations in the middle atmosphere are presented. The observational evident of CGWs will be shown, based on satellites, super-pressure balloons, meteor radar, and high-resolution radiosonde measurements. Regarding the CGW parameterization, the basis of GW parameterization and the development history of CGWs will be provided. The impacts of the parameterized CGWs in the middle atmosphere circulations are given, based on recent works from my research group: (i) the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), (ii) polar-night jet in the southern hemisphere (SH) wintertime, and (iii) Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO). In the tropical stratosphere, CGWs can significantly contribute to the momentum budget of the QBO. The positive momentum forcing by parameterized CGWs is comparable to that by Kelvin wave during the easterly-to-westerly transition, while the negative momentum forcing by parameterized CGWs during the westerly-to-easterly transition is significantly larger than any other equatorial planetary waves (Kang et al. 2018, JAS). Regarding the polar-night jet, Choi and Chun (2013, JAS) demonstrated that excessive jet and cold-pole biases in the SH stratosphere during the wintertime, which have been a long-lasting problem in GCMs, can be alleviated significantly by including a CGW parameterization into a GCM. Recently, Kalish et al. (2018, JGR) showed that cloud-top momentum flux of CGWs evolve following the MJO phases, and the propagation speed of convective cloud associated with the MJO is similar to the dominant eastward-propagating speed of CGWs in the cloud top. Some important issues on the CGW parameterization will be discussed at the end of the seminar.